Discussion:
Explain this to me...(beer content)
(too old to reply)
sweetbac
2013-08-11 21:29:33 UTC
Permalink
Was at the liquor store yesterday...saw a 4 pack of that
Boulevard Brewery Farmhouse 7 Ale...a 4 pack...12 ounce bottles.
$12.99
You fucking kiddin' me?...how much does this shit cost to produce?
The beer is phenominal...that aint the point...why do they price themselves
out of the game like that?
Oh...i HAVE the bread..feel me....that aint the point...
I aint paying $14 something for 4 bottles of NO g'damn beer.
I ended up buying a 12 pack of that Redhook IPA for $10.99.
THATS more like it, Cheif.
Now WHO'S yo daddy!
James Pablos
2013-08-12 01:02:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by sweetbac
Was at the liquor store yesterday...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alcoholics_Anonymous
sweetbac
2013-08-12 01:12:25 UTC
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Post by James Pablos
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alcoholics_Anonymous
Sorry, baby...but I just don't open blind links.
a***@gmail.com
2013-08-12 01:25:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by sweetbac
Was at the liquor store yesterday...saw a 4 pack of that
Boulevard Brewery Farmhouse 7 Ale...a 4 pack...12 ounce bottles.
$12.99
You fucking kiddin' me?...how much does this shit cost to produce?
The beer is phenominal...that aint the point...why do they price themselves
out of the game like that?
Oh...i HAVE the bread..feel me....that aint the point...
I aint paying $14 something for 4 bottles of NO g'damn beer.
I ended up buying a 12 pack of that Redhook IPA for $10.99.
THATS more like it, Cheif.
Now WHO'S yo daddy!
See, $10.99 for those Redhook IPAs? To me that is overpriced. I'm really only interested in quality beers, no matter the price. There are so many excellent beers out there, why the hell would you drink Redhook? At that point, just give up and find the cheapest grain alcohol out there...
sweetbac
2013-08-12 01:47:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by a***@gmail.com
why the hell would you drink Redhook?
At that point, just give up and find the cheapest grain alcohol
I gotta admit, I'm surprised about the Redhook thing too...
the IPA is good...as is their ESB...good....not stellar.
I just can't justify spending $85 on a G'damn case of beer.
Now PLEASE, andrew....you KNOW you got some Coors
in the fridge...C'mon now. <stares>
a***@gmail.com
2013-08-12 03:45:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by sweetbac
Post by a***@gmail.com
why the hell would you drink Redhook?
At that point, just give up and find the cheapest grain alcohol
I gotta admit, I'm surprised about the Redhook thing too...
the IPA is good...as is their ESB...good....not stellar.
I just can't justify spending $85 on a G'damn case of beer.
Now PLEASE, andrew....you KNOW you got some Coors
in the fridge...C'mon now. <stares>
Heh... I will admit to always keeping some Modelo or Tecate or something in the back of the fridge... It's the beer I drink when it is 4am and I want another beer, but know I'm probably not gonna make it through another full one... I've no qualms about dumping two-thirds of a Modelo down the drain in the morning...
sweetbac
2013-08-12 14:41:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by a***@gmail.com
I've no qualms about dumping two-thirds of a Modelo
down the drain in the morning...
So you pee in the shower...did we REALLY need to know that, Champ?
Does this level of recourse occur over on Fagbook/RMGD?
Neil X.
2013-08-12 18:08:23 UTC
Permalink
Yeah, that Tanks 7 Farmhouse is wicked expensive, no doubt about it. I think they believe they can get away with charging that much because it's something like 9% abv. Lotsa band for the buck. But it is way too expensive, no doubt about it. It is also truly stellar, one of the best American made Belgian Saisons I've tasted. But I get it on tap, not in bottles. I'm sure you folks in Cali never see anthing from Pretty Things Ale Project, but Pretty Things also makes stellar Belgians. Their Saison is called Jack D'or, and it is sublime, surpassed only by their Tripel called Fluffy White Rabbits. They also have an Imperiaal Lager called American Darling that is superb. But you might have to come to New England to taste any of these brews.

Peace,
Neil X.
a***@gmail.com
2013-08-12 18:51:02 UTC
Permalink
Yeah, that Tanks 7 Farmhouse is wicked expensive, no doubt about it. I think they believe they can get away with charging that much because it's something like 9% abv. Lotsa band for the buck. But it is way too expensive, no doubt about it. It is also truly stellar, one of the best American made Belgian Saisons I've tasted. But I get it on tap, not in bottles. I'm sure you folks in Cali never see anthing from Pretty Things Ale Project, but Pretty Things also makes stellar Belgians. Their Saison is called Jack D'or, and it is sublime, surpassed only by their Tripel called Fluffy White Rabbits. They also have an Imperiaal Lager called American Darling that is superb. But you might have to come to New England to taste any of these brews.
You'd be wrong. That Saison is all over the place down my way at least...I've seen the Tripel on tap at least, but not in bottles... I'm sure I've seen others, but maybe tuned those out.
Neil X.
2013-08-15 20:37:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by a***@gmail.com
Yeah, that Tanks 7 Farmhouse is wicked expensive, no doubt about it. I think they believe they can get away with charging that much because it's something like 9% abv. Lotsa band for the buck. But it is way too expensive, no doubt about it. It is also truly stellar, one of the best American made Belgian Saisons I've tasted. But I get it on tap, not in bottles. I'm sure you folks in Cali never see anthing from Pretty Things Ale Project, but Pretty Things also makes stellar Belgians. Their Saison is called Jack D'or, and it is sublime, surpassed only by their Tripel called Fluffy White Rabbits. They also have an Imperiaal Lager called American Darling that is superb. But you might have to come to New England to taste any of these brews.
You'd be wrong. That Saison is all over the place down my way at least...I've seen the Tripel on tap at least, but not in bottles... I'm sure I've seen others, but maybe tuned those out.
Well give it a try, if you like Belgians. High quality stuff.

Peace,
Neil X.
Brad Greer
2013-08-12 23:20:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Neil X.
Yeah, that Tanks 7 Farmhouse is wicked expensive, no doubt about it. I think they believe they can get away with charging that much because it's something like 9% abv. Lotsa band for the buck. But it is way too expensive, no doubt about it. It is also truly stellar, one of the best American made Belgian Saisons I've tasted. But I get it on tap, not in bottles. I'm sure you folks in Cali never see anthing from Pretty Things Ale Project, but Pretty Things also makes stellar Belgians. Their Saison is called Jack D'or, and it is sublime, surpassed only by their Tripel called Fluffy White Rabbits. They also have an Imperiaal Lager called American Darling that is superb. But you might have to come to New England to taste any of these brews.
9% abv isn't exactly rare in the craft beer space, certainly not
something that could be used to justify the price. Sierra Nevada's
Bigfoor, for example, is 9.6% abv, there are stronger beers out there.

I'm sure they feel that pricing it higher gives the beer a certain
snob appeal...
a***@gmail.com
2013-08-13 00:32:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Brad Greer
Post by Neil X.
Yeah, that Tanks 7 Farmhouse is wicked expensive, no doubt about it. I think they believe they can get away with charging that much because it's something like 9% abv. Lotsa band for the buck. But it is way too expensive, no doubt about it. It is also truly stellar, one of the best American made Belgian Saisons I've tasted. But I get it on tap, not in bottles. I'm sure you folks in Cali never see anthing from Pretty Things Ale Project, but Pretty Things also makes stellar Belgians. Their Saison is called Jack D'or, and it is sublime, surpassed only by their Tripel called Fluffy White Rabbits. They also have an Imperiaal Lager called American Darling that is superb. But you might have to come to New England to taste any of these brews.
9% abv isn't exactly rare in the craft beer space, certainly not
something that could be used to justify the price. Sierra Nevada's
Bigfoor, for example, is 9.6% abv, there are stronger beers out there.
Of course, Big Foot is in the range of $16 for a sixer...
Post by Brad Greer
I'm sure they feel that pricing it higher gives the beer a certain
snob appeal...
That and there are beers that just cost more to make... add more of any one ingredient obviously costs more and adding rarer ingredients cost more...
the Felonious Kidd
2013-08-13 02:19:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by a***@gmail.com
Post by Brad Greer
I'm sure they feel that pricing it higher gives the beer a certain
snob appeal...
That and there are beers that just cost more to make... add more of any one ingredient obviously costs more and adding rarer ingredients cost more...
Water, barley malt, hops, yeast, and water, that's the ingredients list. Add other ingredients and IMO it is a fermented malt beverage, you know, like Smirnoff Ice.
the Felonious Kidd
2013-08-13 02:21:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by the Felonious Kidd
Post by a***@gmail.com
Post by Brad Greer
I'm sure they feel that pricing it higher gives the beer a certain
snob appeal...
That and there are beers that just cost more to make... add more of any one ingredient obviously costs more and adding rarer ingredients cost more...
Water, barley malt, hops, yeast, and water, that's the ingredients list. Add other ingredients and IMO it is a fermented malt beverage, you know, like Smirnoff Ice.
Water, barley malt, hops, and yeast...

I should know better than to proof read while sober.
a***@gmail.com
2013-08-13 02:49:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by the Felonious Kidd
Post by a***@gmail.com
Post by Brad Greer
I'm sure they feel that pricing it higher gives the beer a certain
snob appeal...
That and there are beers that just cost more to make... add more of any one ingredient obviously costs more and adding rarer ingredients cost more...
Water, barley malt, hops, yeast, and water, that's the ingredients list.
Not all hops, for instance, are created or priced or as readily available, equally. Nor are they added in the same amounts in all beers. Some beers are hopped once, others multiple times... Some beers have yeast added once, others are pitched two or three times. Throw in the fact that some brews require more effort and the fact that beers brewed less often or in smaller batches will inherently cost more due to economies of scale and some beers will be more expensive to produce than others... Doesn't account for all of the price of this particular beer, but certainly some beers are more expensive to produce than others.
the Felonious Kidd
2013-08-13 06:00:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by a***@gmail.com
Post by the Felonious Kidd
Post by a***@gmail.com
Post by Brad Greer
I'm sure they feel that pricing it higher gives the beer a certain
snob appeal...
That and there are beers that just cost more to make... add more of any one ingredient obviously costs more and adding rarer ingredients cost more...
Water, barley malt, hops, yeast, and water, that's the ingredients list.
Not all hops, for instance, are created or priced or as readily available, equally. Nor are they added in the same amounts in all beers. Some beers are hopped once, others multiple times... Some beers have yeast added once, others are pitched two or three times. Throw in the fact that some brews require more effort and the fact that beers brewed less often or in smaller batches will inherently cost more due to economies of scale and some beers will be more expensive to produce than others... Doesn't account for all of the price of this particular beer, but certainly some beers are more expensive to produce than others.
Do I need to start calling you Randy? Jeeze! Thanks for the education, before this I knew absolutely nothing what-so-ever about how beers are brewed. Here I thought the prices were so high due to having to pay some wizard to come up with cutesie names like "Roman Orgy Double Fornicator Impale Ale". Alas, the market will bear high prices when the market is heavily populated with folks who are trying to impress their friends.
Band Beyond Desu
2013-08-13 10:30:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by the Felonious Kidd
Post by a***@gmail.com
Post by the Felonious Kidd
Post by a***@gmail.com
Post by Brad Greer
I'm sure they feel that pricing it higher gives the beer a certain
snob appeal...
That and there are beers that just cost more to make... add more of
any one ingredient obviously costs more and adding rarer ingredients cost more...
Water, barley malt, hops, yeast, and water, that's the ingredients list.
Not all hops, for instance, are created or priced or as readily
available, equally. Nor are they added in the same amounts in all beers.
Some beers are hopped once, others multiple times... Some beers have
yeast added once, others are pitched two or three times. Throw in the
fact that some brews require more effort and the fact that beers brewed
less often or in smaller batches will inherently cost more due to
economies of scale and some beers will be more expensive to produce than
others... Doesn't account for all of the price of this particular beer,
but certainly some beers are more expensive to produce than others.
Do I need to start calling you Randy? Jeeze! Thanks for the education,
before this I knew absolutely nothing what-so-ever about how beers are
brewed. Here I thought the prices were so high due to having to pay some
wizard to come up with cutesie names like "Roman Orgy Double Fornicator
Impale Ale". Alas, the market will bear high prices when the market is
heavily populated with folks who are trying to impress their friends.
Yeah, bring back the days of Blatz! ###
Thomas Beck
2013-08-13 22:44:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Band Beyond Desu
Yeah, bring back the days of Blatz! ###
Uuugh. Lurch turns and walks slowly from room.
dr.narcolepsy
2013-08-13 15:59:32 UTC
Permalink
On Tuesday, August 13, 2013 2:00:05 AM UTC-4, the Felonious Kidd wrote:
thought the prices were so high due to having to pay some wizard to come up with cutesie names like "Roman Orgy Double Fornicator Impale Ale". Alas, the market

I made the mistake of telling my kid, once, after he laughed at the name of a candy bar, or something, "You know, son of dr.narcolepsy, someone gets paid to come up with that name." A brief back and forth ensued on several ways in which a person, or group of people, could get paid for coming up with a brand/model/item name. We laughed, it was a funny conversation.

But I don't laugh, anymore - now, every single time either of us mention a brand name, in public, usually in line at some store, he'll deadpan, "Someone got paid to come up with that name, right Dad? That's what you told me, right Dad?" He'll make sure he's asking loudly enough to be heard.
a***@gmail.com
2013-08-13 16:10:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by the Felonious Kidd
Post by a***@gmail.com
Post by the Felonious Kidd
Post by a***@gmail.com
Post by Brad Greer
I'm sure they feel that pricing it higher gives the beer a certain
snob appeal...
That and there are beers that just cost more to make... add more of any one ingredient obviously costs more and adding rarer ingredients cost more...
Water, barley malt, hops, yeast, and water, that's the ingredients list.
Not all hops, for instance, are created or priced or as readily available, equally. Nor are they added in the same amounts in all beers. Some beers are hopped once, others multiple times... Some beers have yeast added once, others are pitched two or three times. Throw in the fact that some brews require more effort and the fact that beers brewed less often or in smaller batches will inherently cost more due to economies of scale and some beers will be more expensive to produce than others... Doesn't account for all of the price of this particular beer, but certainly some beers are more expensive to produce than others.
Do I need to start calling you Randy? Jeeze! Thanks for the education, before this I knew absolutely nothing what-so-ever about how beers are brewed. Here I thought the prices were so high due to having to pay some wizard to come up with cutesie names like "Roman Orgy Double Fornicator Impale Ale". Alas, the market will bear high prices when the market is heavily populated with folks who are trying to impress their friends.
Heh... Sorry Mr. All Beers Have The Same Exact Ingredients... I couldn't tell if you were playing stupid or were actually stupid... Lesson learned.
the Felonious Kidd
2013-08-13 23:57:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by a***@gmail.com
Post by the Felonious Kidd
Post by a***@gmail.com
Post by the Felonious Kidd
Post by a***@gmail.com
Post by Brad Greer
I'm sure they feel that pricing it higher gives the beer a certain
snob appeal...
That and there are beers that just cost more to make... add more of any one ingredient obviously costs more and adding rarer ingredients cost more...
Water, barley malt, hops, yeast, and water, that's the ingredients list.
Not all hops, for instance, are created or priced or as readily available, equally. Nor are they added in the same amounts in all beers. Some beers are hopped once, others multiple times... Some beers have yeast added once, others are pitched two or three times. Throw in the fact that some brews require more effort and the fact that beers brewed less often or in smaller batches will inherently cost more due to economies of scale and some beers will be more expensive to produce than others... Doesn't account for all of the price of this particular beer, but certainly some beers are more expensive to produce than others.
Do I need to start calling you Randy? Jeeze! Thanks for the education, before this I knew absolutely nothing what-so-ever about how beers are brewed. Here I thought the prices were so high due to having to pay some wizard to come up with cutesie names like "Roman Orgy Double Fornicator Impale Ale". Alas, the market will bear high prices when the market is heavily populated with folks who are trying to impress their friends.
Heh... Sorry Mr. All Beers Have The Same Exact Ingredients... I couldn't tell if you were playing stupid or were actually stupid... Lesson learned.
Don't take it personally. I have it on good authority that you are a nice guy even if your post was a little pedantic. I am a self confessed stick-in-the-mud. I am also a self confessed borderline obsessive Reinheitsgebot devotee. I understand that people throw all manner of stuff in the brew kettle and aging barrel, but I prefer the basics. I like beer, no extra stuff, no notes of peanut butter on the nose or hints of durian on the palate required.
dr.narcolepsy
2013-08-14 00:18:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by the Felonious Kidd
Don't take it personally. I have it on good authority that you are a nice guy even if your post was a little pedantic. I am a self confessed stick-in-the-mud. I am also a self confessed borderline obsessive Reinheitsgebot devotee. I understand that people throw all manner of stuff in the brew kettle and aging barrel, but I prefer the basics. I like beer, no extra stuff, no notes of peanut butter on the nose or hints of durian on the palate required.
I remember my first blow job, too.
sparksfly
2013-08-14 01:08:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by dr.narcolepsy
Post by the Felonious Kidd
Don't take it personally. I have it on good authority that you are a nice guy even if your post was a little pedantic. I am a self confessed stick-in-the-mud. I am also a self confessed borderline obsessive Reinheitsgebot devotee. I understand that people throw all manner of stuff in the brew kettle and aging barrel, but I prefer the basics. I like beer, no extra stuff, no notes of peanut butter on the nose or hints of durian on the palate required.
I remember my first blow job, too.
What was his name?

<high fives rmgd>
dr.narcolepsy
2013-08-14 02:45:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by sparksfly
Post by dr.narcolepsy
Post by the Felonious Kidd
Don't take it personally. I have it on good authority that you are a nice guy even if your post was a little pedantic. I am a self confessed stick-in-the-mud. I am also a self confessed borderline obsessive Reinheitsgebot devotee. I understand that people throw all manner of stuff in the brew kettle and aging barrel, but I prefer the basics. I like beer, no extra stuff, no notes of peanut butter on the nose or hints of durian on the palate required.
I remember my first blow job, too.
What was his name?
<high fives rmgd>
Ha! You were supposed to say, "How did it taste?"
Edwin Hurwitz
2013-08-15 17:37:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by dr.narcolepsy
Post by sparksfly
Post by dr.narcolepsy
Post by the Felonious Kidd
Don't take it personally. I have it on good authority that you are a
nice guy even if your post was a little pedantic. I am a self confessed
stick-in-the-mud. I am also a self confessed borderline obsessive
Reinheitsgebot devotee. I understand that people throw all manner of
stuff in the brew kettle and aging barrel, but I prefer the basics. I
like beer, no extra stuff, no notes of peanut butter on the nose or
hints of durian on the palate required.
I remember my first blow job, too.
What was his name?
<high fives rmgd>
Ha! You were supposed to say, "How did it taste?"
<high fives dr. narco>
a***@gmail.com
2013-08-14 03:43:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by the Felonious Kidd
Post by a***@gmail.com
Post by the Felonious Kidd
Post by a***@gmail.com
Post by the Felonious Kidd
Post by a***@gmail.com
Post by Brad Greer
I'm sure they feel that pricing it higher gives the beer a certain
snob appeal...
That and there are beers that just cost more to make... add more of any one ingredient obviously costs more and adding rarer ingredients cost more...
Water, barley malt, hops, yeast, and water, that's the ingredients list.
Not all hops, for instance, are created or priced or as readily available, equally. Nor are they added in the same amounts in all beers. Some beers are hopped once, others multiple times... Some beers have yeast added once, others are pitched two or three times. Throw in the fact that some brews require more effort and the fact that beers brewed less often or in smaller batches will inherently cost more due to economies of scale and some beers will be more expensive to produce than others... Doesn't account for all of the price of this particular beer, but certainly some beers are more expensive to produce than others.
Do I need to start calling you Randy? Jeeze! Thanks for the education, before this I knew absolutely nothing what-so-ever about how beers are brewed. Here I thought the prices were so high due to having to pay some wizard to come up with cutesie names like "Roman Orgy Double Fornicator Impale Ale". Alas, the market will bear high prices when the market is heavily populated with folks who are trying to impress their friends.
Heh... Sorry Mr. All Beers Have The Same Exact Ingredients... I couldn't tell if you were playing stupid or were actually stupid... Lesson learned.
Don't take it personally. I have it on good authority that you are a nice guy even if your post was a little pedantic.
Don't believe 'em...
Randy G
2013-08-14 13:19:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by the Felonious Kidd
I am also a self confessed borderline obsessive Reinheitsgebot devotee. I understand that people throw all manner of stuff in the brew kettle and aging barrel, but I prefer the basics. I like beer, no extra stuff, no notes of peanut butter on the nose or hints of durian on the palate required.
I agree for the most part for commercial beers, but as a homebrewer that gets boring. My imperial ancho chile smoked porter is one of my favorite beers I have ever had, along with some bourbon barrel imperial stouts.
I just harvested a bunch of cantaloupe from my garden and will be making a canteloupe-cayenne pepper beer soon, which is something you will never find on a beer shelf. Having the freedom to make the beer I like and not be restricted to a law that is over 500 years old, and has since been repealed, is the main reason I am a homebrewer.
I've never had a peanut butter beer that tasted good.
sparksfly
2013-08-14 15:55:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Randy G
Post by the Felonious Kidd
I am also a self confessed borderline obsessive Reinheitsgebot devotee. I understand that people throw all manner of stuff in the brew kettle and aging barrel, but I prefer the basics. I like beer, no extra stuff, no notes of peanut butter on the nose or hints of durian on the palate required.
I agree for the most part for commercial beers, but as a homebrewer that gets boring. My imperial ancho chile smoked porter is one of my favorite beers I have ever had, along with some bourbon barrel imperial stouts.
I just harvested a bunch of cantaloupe from my garden and will be making a canteloupe-cayenne pepper beer soon, which is something you will never find on a beer shelf. Having the freedom to make the beer I like and not be restricted to a law that is over 500 years old, and has since been repealed, is the main reason I am a homebrewer.
I've never had a peanut butter beer that tasted good.
How about some Blueberry Kush beer? Has anybody combined cannabis and beer yet?
Randy G
2013-08-14 17:18:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by sparksfly
How about some Blueberry Kush beer? Has anybody combined cannabis and beer yet?
Someone in my homebrew club has, and it was OK. THC is fat or alcohol soluble, and I doubt he took the proper steps to extract the THC. The worst part was burping afterward - it tasted like bongwater every time I burped. And from what he told me, the gas it gave you smelled like shitty (no pun intended) weed burning.
Brad Greer
2013-08-17 12:00:35 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 14 Aug 2013 10:18:59 -0700 (PDT), Randy G
Post by Randy G
Post by sparksfly
How about some Blueberry Kush beer? Has anybody combined cannabis and beer yet?
Someone in my homebrew club has, and it was OK. THC is fat or alcohol soluble, and I doubt he took the proper steps to extract the THC. The worst part was burping afterward - it tasted like bongwater every time I burped. And from what he told me, the gas it gave you smelled like shitty (no pun intended) weed burning.
Best way to extract the THC is by dry-hopping with the weed, although
I don't think the beer will be all that stony.
sweetbac
2013-08-15 22:56:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by sparksfly
Has anybody combined cannabis and beer yet?
Pretty much every weekend there, Champ.
Damn...my cannabis card for my persistent, invasive, obtrusive
OCD condition expires next month...better stock up.
Now where's that toothbrush...the sidewalk needs scrubbing!
the Felonious Kidd
2013-08-14 16:03:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Randy G
Post by the Felonious Kidd
I am also a self confessed borderline obsessive Reinheitsgebot devotee. I understand that people throw all manner of stuff in the brew kettle and aging barrel, but I prefer the basics. I like beer, no extra stuff, no notes of peanut butter on the nose or hints of durian on the palate required.
Having the freedom to make the beer I like and not be restricted to a law that is over 500 years old, and has since been repealed, is the main reason I am a homebrewer.
So what part of Germany are you living in that you living in that you can get away with such lawlessness?

"In May 1988, a European Court of Justice ruling led to the Reinheitsgebot being lifted, allowing ingredients beyond what was listed in the Biersteuergesetz; this meant that anything allowed in other foods was thus also allowed in beer. The lifting of the Biergesetz, however, only concerns imported beer. Beer brewed in Germany still has to abide to it."

The thing that seems to have been missed in my August 12th post was the part that said ***IMO***. Brew on brother and brew what makes you happy.
SK
2013-08-14 16:49:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by the Felonious Kidd
Post by Randy G
Post by the Felonious Kidd
I am also a self confessed borderline obsessive Reinheitsgebot devotee. I
understand that people throw all manner of stuff in the brew kettle and
aging barrel, but I prefer the basics. I like beer, no extra stuff, no
notes of peanut butter on the nose or hints of durian on the palate
required.
Having the freedom to make the beer I like and not be restricted to a law
that is over 500 years old, and has since been repealed, is the main reason
I am a homebrewer.
So what part of Germany are you living in that you living in that you can get
away with such lawlessness?
"In May 1988, a European Court of Justice ruling led to the Reinheitsgebot
being lifted, allowing ingredients beyond what was listed in the
Biersteuergesetz; this meant that anything allowed in other foods was thus
also allowed in beer. The lifting of the Biergesetz, however, only concerns
imported beer. Beer brewed in Germany still has to abide to it."
The thing that seems to have been missed in my August 12th post was the part
that said ***IMO***. Brew on brother and brew what makes you happy.
Yes, no need the fight, quarrel, whatever. Beer is important. Reinheit
is important, but not to Belgians. They make great beer too.

Most important is that beer is healthy. No really...
http://health.yahoo.net/experts/dayinhealth/10-surprising-health-benefits
-beer
But there are 13 more reasons...
http://www.bild.de/ratgeber/gesundheit/bier/23-gruende-oefter-mal-ein-bie
r-zu-trinken-gesund-schoen-8072520.bild.html
which you can read, but don't understand.

One in three breweries are in Germany (1250 breweries) and I'm lucky to
have such a great neighbor.

So, enjoy whatever beer makes you happy.
SK.
Brad Greer
2013-08-15 23:08:50 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 14 Aug 2013 09:03:37 -0700 (PDT), the Felonious Kidd
Post by the Felonious Kidd
Post by Randy G
Post by the Felonious Kidd
I am also a self confessed borderline obsessive Reinheitsgebot devotee. I understand that people throw all manner of stuff in the brew kettle and aging barrel, but I prefer the basics. I like beer, no extra stuff, no notes of peanut butter on the nose or hints of durian on the palate required.
Having the freedom to make the beer I like and not be restricted to a law that is over 500 years old, and has since been repealed, is the main reason I am a homebrewer.
So what part of Germany are you living in that you living in that you can get away with such lawlessness?
"In May 1988, a European Court of Justice ruling led to the Reinheitsgebot being lifted, allowing ingredients beyond what was listed in the Biersteuergesetz; this meant that anything allowed in other foods was thus also allowed in beer. The lifting of the Biergesetz, however, only concerns imported beer. Beer brewed in Germany still has to abide to it."
Well, except for heffeweizen...
the Felonious Kidd
2013-08-16 13:29:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Brad Greer
On Wed, 14 Aug 2013 09:03:37 -0700 (PDT), the Felonious Kidd
Post by the Felonious Kidd
"In May 1988, a European Court of Justice ruling led to the Reinheitsgebot being lifted, allowing ingredients beyond what was listed in the Biersteuergesetz; this meant that anything allowed in other foods was thus also allowed in beer. The lifting of the Biergesetz, however, only concerns imported beer. Beer brewed in Germany still has to abide to it."
Well, except for heffeweizen...
Uhhh.... that'd be the reason they call it, weissbier, weizenbier, hefeweizen, etc., and they don't call it just "beir" because by law they can't. German law also requires that wheat beers be ales, not lagers.
the Felonious Kidd
2013-08-16 13:48:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by the Felonious Kidd
Post by Brad Greer
On Wed, 14 Aug 2013 09:03:37 -0700 (PDT), the Felonious Kidd
Post by the Felonious Kidd
"In May 1988, a European Court of Justice ruling led to the Reinheitsgebot being lifted, allowing ingredients beyond what was listed in the Biersteuergesetz; this meant that anything allowed in other foods was thus also allowed in beer. The lifting of the Biergesetz, however, only concerns imported beer. Beer brewed in Germany still has to abide to it."
Well, except for heffeweizen...
Uhhh.... that'd be the reason they call it, weissbier, weizenbier, hefeweizen, etc., and they don't call it just "beir" because by law they can't. German law also requires that wheat beers be ales, not lagers.
I should add that this is why am so OC about the Reinheitsgebot, it is sort of a truth in labeling law that lets me know what I am buying. Unlike the American "system" where it is controlled by patchwork state law and a lager might be called an ale depending on ABV and jurisdiction. Or as I have whined about on here before now you have trendy craft brewers calling lagers ales as in NB 1554, or selling oxymoronic dark IPAs.
Randy G
2013-08-16 15:04:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by the Felonious Kidd
I should add that this is why am so OC about the Reinheitsgebot, it is sort of a truth in labeling law that lets me know what I am buying. Unlike the American "system" where it is controlled by patchwork state law and a lager might be called an ale depending on ABV and jurisdiction. Or as I have whined about on here before now you have trendy craft brewers calling lagers ales as in NB 1554, or selling oxymoronic dark IPAs.
I just wish all breweries would have an easy to read 'best by' date. Nutritional info would be nice too.
For me, the only thing that makes it a lager or ale is the yeast strain they use, period. I don't know why New Belgium does that, but then again I think I have only had one or 2 of their beers that I like.
the Felonious Kidd
2013-08-17 17:07:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Randy G
I just wish all breweries would have an easy to read 'best by' date. Nutritional info would be nice too.
For me, the only thing that makes it a lager or ale is the yeast strain they use, period.
I sure would not mind if brewers put an ingredients label on their product. I'm not suggesting another "anti-business" labeling law. But some brewers would be more likely to get me to try their product if I know more about what is in their product and as precisely as possible what style they are going for. To me there is a big difference between an English style red bitter and a American micro red bitter.
Brad Greer
2013-08-17 12:10:33 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 16 Aug 2013 06:48:27 -0700 (PDT), the Felonious Kidd
Post by the Felonious Kidd
Post by the Felonious Kidd
Post by Brad Greer
On Wed, 14 Aug 2013 09:03:37 -0700 (PDT), the Felonious Kidd
Post by the Felonious Kidd
"In May 1988, a European Court of Justice ruling led to the Reinheitsgebot being lifted, allowing ingredients beyond what was listed in the Biersteuergesetz; this meant that anything allowed in other foods was thus also allowed in beer. The lifting of the Biergesetz, however, only concerns imported beer. Beer brewed in Germany still has to abide to it."
Well, except for heffeweizen...
Uhhh.... that'd be the reason they call it, weissbier, weizenbier, hefeweizen, etc., and they don't call it just "beir" because by law they can't. German law also requires that wheat beers be ales, not lagers.
I should add that this is why am so OC about the Reinheitsgebot, it is sort of a truth in labeling law that lets me know what I am buying. Unlike the American "system" where it is controlled by patchwork state law and a lager might be called an ale depending on ABV and jurisdiction. Or as I have whined about on here before now you have trendy craft brewers calling lagers ales as in NB 1554, or selling oxymoronic dark IPAs.
The Reinheitsgebot had as much to do with limiting competition from
non-Bavarian beers as it did with "purity." The original law didn't
include yeast because brewers didn't know what yeast was or what it
did for the brewing process. The restriction to only use barley was
put in place to make sure that wheat was available for bakers, not
because of any belief that using wheat in beer was somehow bad.

There's nothing wrong with a beer made with strictly malted barley,
water, hops and yeast, in fact many great beers are made that way. But
to pretend that wheat beers aren't good beers or that oatmeal stout is
a crime against nature is just silly. Keep out the low-quality
adjuncts used by the megabrewers and you can make some fine beers.
Sure, some brewers go overboard but just avoid those brews if you
don't like them (I generally don't, although I have nothing against a
coffee stout). Worry instead about the quality of ingredients and the
ability of the brewer to make something that tastes good.
B
2013-08-17 14:41:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Brad Greer
There's nothing wrong with a beer made with strictly malted barley,
water, hops and yeast, in fact many great beers are made that way. But
to pretend that wheat beers aren't good beers or that oatmeal stout is
a crime against nature is just silly. Keep out the low-quality
adjuncts used by the megabrewers and you can make some fine beers.
Sure, some brewers go overboard but just avoid those brews if you
don't like them (I generally don't, although I have nothing against a
coffee stout). Worry instead about the quality of ingredients and the
ability of the brewer to make something that tastes good.
I've never had a wheat brew that I loved and I've had several oatmeal
stouts that I did. Different strokes. The main issue for me with wheats is
the often excess fruit infusion. Why do micro's find that a good idea? Is
there such thing as a non-fruity, clean refreshing wheat?

"Snapple?" "No, too fruity".
the Felonious Kidd
2013-08-17 16:48:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by B
Post by Brad Greer
There's nothing wrong with a beer made with strictly malted barley,
water, hops and yeast, in fact many great beers are made that way. But
to pretend that wheat beers aren't good beers or that oatmeal stout is
a crime against nature is just silly. Keep out the low-quality
adjuncts used by the megabrewers and you can make some fine beers.
Sure, some brewers go overboard but just avoid those brews if you
don't like them (I generally don't, although I have nothing against a
coffee stout). Worry instead about the quality of ingredients and the
ability of the brewer to make something that tastes good.
I've never had a wheat brew that I loved and I've had several oatmeal
stouts that I did. Different strokes. The main issue for me with wheats is
the often excess fruit infusion. Why do micro's find that a good idea? Is
there such thing as a non-fruity, clean refreshing wheat?
"Snapple?" "No, too fruity".
Thanks for handling that one for me B! I tend to drink wheat beers only when I am in the rare mood because of the double whammy of sweeter malts and fruity ester yeast. There are some wheats I have tasted that managed to find a decent hop balance. Stouts are another art altogether. I drink them when I am in the mood, rarely.

I was talking about my taste and what constitutes a "beer" versus a "fermented malt beverage" ****IMO****. I never suggested that my tastes are superior, and I don't find it reasonable to suggest that I (or you) should love some "fermented malt beverage" just because someone else does. And I was saying that it is tough to tell when "some brewers go overboard" when they are more concerned about coming up with cute names for their brew than they are about telling me what their brew IS.
B
2013-08-18 15:16:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by the Felonious Kidd
Post by B
Post by Brad Greer
There's nothing wrong with a beer made with strictly malted barley,
water, hops and yeast, in fact many great beers are made that way. But
to pretend that wheat beers aren't good beers or that oatmeal stout is
a crime against nature is just silly. Keep out the low-quality
adjuncts used by the megabrewers and you can make some fine beers.
Sure, some brewers go overboard but just avoid those brews if you
don't like them (I generally don't, although I have nothing against a
coffee stout). Worry instead about the quality of ingredients and the
ability of the brewer to make something that tastes good.
I've never had a wheat brew that I loved and I've had several oatmeal
stouts that I did. Different strokes. The main issue for me with wheats is
the often excess fruit infusion. Why do micro's find that a good idea? Is
there such thing as a non-fruity, clean refreshing wheat?
"Snapple?" "No, too fruity".
Thanks for handling that one for me B! I tend to drink wheat beers only
when I am in the rare mood because of the double whammy of sweeter malts
and fruity ester yeast. There are some wheats I have tasted that managed
to find a decent hop balance. Stouts are another art altogether. I drink
them when I am in the mood, rarely.
How about porters? I like porters sometimes as they are lighter than a
stout, zipper in carbonation and still hold dense flavor. Can I hear some
love for the porter <insert Sweetbac train joke here>. I'll drink an
occasional porter in the summer but stouts only in cold weather.
sweetbac
2013-08-17 19:21:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by B
I've never had a wheat brew that I loved and I've had
several oatmeal stouts that I did.
I lost my taste for stouts...though Iwill have the occasional
Guiness...too heavy.
I'm a devoted Wheat/Hefe imbiber.
Though I just picked up a 12'er of that new Anchor "California Lager"
Nice beer, there.
B
2013-08-18 15:18:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by sweetbac
Post by B
I've never had a wheat brew that I loved and I've had
several oatmeal stouts that I did.
I lost my taste for stouts...though Iwill have the occasional
Guiness...too heavy.
On a cold winter's eve, something you don't really see in your neck, a
Guiness served properly poured from a fresh pub tap, can be sublime.
Post by sweetbac
I'm a devoted Wheat/Hefe imbiber.
Though I just picked up a 12'er of that new Anchor "California Lager"
Nice beer, there.
I'm an Anchor fan through and through but there non standard releases can
be hard to find in NY's Westchester County.
the Felonious Kidd
2013-08-18 16:43:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by sweetbac
Post by B
I've never had a wheat brew that I loved and I've had
several oatmeal stouts that I did.
I lost my taste for stouts...though Iwill have the occasional
Guiness...too heavy.
I'm a devoted Wheat/Hefe imbiber.
Though I just picked up a 12'er of that new Anchor "California Lager"
Nice beer, there.
I've been keeping my eyes open for the Anchor Lager, but so far I have only found the Summer and Liberty ales.
Some of my stout doubt goes back to a specific incident with me on a months long stout kick, during the worst work related stress of my life while trying to finish a BS degree in night school, going camping with my buddies to blow off steam and knocking back one too many stouts and bong hits and well....
Brad Greer
2013-08-15 23:12:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by a***@gmail.com
Post by Brad Greer
Post by Neil X.
Yeah, that Tanks 7 Farmhouse is wicked expensive, no doubt about it. I think they believe they can get away with charging that much because it's something like 9% abv. Lotsa band for the buck. But it is way too expensive, no doubt about it. It is also truly stellar, one of the best American made Belgian Saisons I've tasted. But I get it on tap, not in bottles. I'm sure you folks in Cali never see anthing from Pretty Things Ale Project, but Pretty Things also makes stellar Belgians. Their Saison is called Jack D'or, and it is sublime, surpassed only by their Tripel called Fluffy White Rabbits. They also have an Imperiaal Lager called American Darling that is superb. But you might have to come to New England to taste any of these brews.
9% abv isn't exactly rare in the craft beer space, certainly not
something that could be used to justify the price. Sierra Nevada's
Bigfoor, for example, is 9.6% abv, there are stronger beers out there.
Of course, Big Foot is in the range of $16 for a sixer...
I don't remember it being that high. But my point was more along the
lines that 9% abv is hardly an unusually high alcohol beer nowadays.
And I've not noticed more than a very casual relationship between
price and abv, although I'll admit I haven't spent much time thinking
about it.
Post by a***@gmail.com
Post by Brad Greer
I'm sure they feel that pricing it higher gives the beer a certain
snob appeal...
That and there are beers that just cost more to make... add more of any one ingredient obviously costs more and adding rarer ingredients cost more...
Yes there are, and small batches will cost more than larger batches.
But marking up the price because the market will buy it at that price
is basic business practice.
the Felonious Kidd
2013-08-13 02:13:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Brad Greer
I'm sure they feel that pricing it higher gives the beer a certain
snob appeal...
Beer on a champagne budget.
sweetbac
2013-08-13 02:15:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Brad Greer
9% abv isn't exactly rare in the craft beer space, certainly not
something that could be used to justify the price. Sierra Nevada's
Bigfoor, for example, is 9.6% abv, there are stronger beers out there.
I'm sure they feel that pricing it higher gives the beer a certain
snob appeal...
True dat.
I see NO correlation between price and alc/vol...
shit, Olde English 800 would be $8.99/24 ounce if that was the case.
That Boulevard brewery was new to me when my buddy sent me
that Farmhouse 7 bottle....do they make a fair priced 6 pack of something,
or is it one of them limp wrist boutique breweries thats clogging up
industrie?
CivetCat
2013-08-13 20:39:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by sweetbac
True dat.
I see NO correlation between price and alc/vol...
shit, Olde English 800 would be $8.99/24 ounce if that was the case.
That Boulevard brewery was new to me when my buddy sent me
that Farmhouse 7 bottle....do they make a fair priced 6 pack of something,
or is it one of them limp wrist boutique breweries thats clogging up
industrie?
Hey Sweetbac,

Boulevard Brewing Company has what they call their "Year-Round" and
"Seasonal" beers. Here in their hometown Kansas City MO, our local Trader
Joe's sells 6 packs warm for $7.49. My neighborhood grocekry sells 6 packs
cold for $8.49. 12 packs can often be found on sale for $12.99.

Tank 7 Farmhouse Ale is one of Boulevard's "Smokestack Series" of higher
priced premium beer. Those 4 packs sell for $10.99 here, so it looks like
you California folks are paying $2 extra to have it shipped half-way across
the country.

I usually pay around $8.49 for a 750 mL bottle of the Smokestack Series
(corked and caged, dude). Using the "Beer Finder" on Boulevard's website,
it appears that the brewery is only shipping their higher-priced Smokestack
Series to San Francisco at this time.

If you enjoyed Tank 7 Farmhouse Ale, you should really try their "Long
Strange Tripel" beer for Deadheads. Watch out for their "Rye-On-Rye" and
other beers that are aged in used oak whiskey barrels. Don't know about
you, but I don't much care for beer that tastes like whiskey.

For your browsing pleasure, here is a link to Boulevard's website:

http://www.boulevard.com/beers/about-our-beers/

I'm currently enjoying their new Pop-Up Session IPA, which joins its
brethren Single Wide IPA and Double Wide IPA.

Jules
the wharf rat
2013-08-14 01:25:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Brad Greer
I'm sure they feel that pricing it higher gives the beer a certain
snob appeal...
When I was in business school I did a marketing study on beer,
and it turns out that the perceived quality of a beer is highly correlated
with the price. Give people samples of the same beer and tell some it costs
$1.50 and some it costs $10.50 and the ten dollar people will rate it much
more highly.

Go figure...
j***@gmail.com
2013-08-16 15:46:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by sweetbac
Was at the liquor store yesterday...saw a 4 pack of that
Boulevard Brewery Farmhouse 7 Ale...a 4 pack...12 ounce bottles.
$12.99
You fucking kiddin' me?...how much does this shit cost to produce?
The beer is phenominal...that aint the point...why do they price themselves
out of the game like that?
Oh...i HAVE the bread..feel me....that aint the point...
I aint paying $14 something for 4 bottles of NO g'damn beer.
I ended up buying a 12 pack of that Redhook IPA for $10.99.
THATS more like it, Cheif.
Now WHO'S yo daddy!
Dave, off topic but my kids are going to SF/Big Sur Sonoma late Aug.Any must sees beer/winery wise?Checked into music can't find anything happenin tho.thanks for any ideas Jake
sweetbac
2013-08-16 17:00:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by j***@gmail.com
Dave, off topic but my kids are going to SF/Big Sur Sonoma late Aug.
Any must sees beer/winery wise?
Checked into music can't find anything happenin tho.
thanks for any ideas Jake
Anchor Steam brewery tour ( if they can get reservations)
Pyramid brewery over in Berkeley also has tours.
Nevermind all that...how much scratch are you giving the
kids for the trip?...I'm available to tour guide.
Let me know.
frenchu4@comcast.net
2013-08-16 17:23:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by sweetbac
Post by j***@gmail.com
Dave, off topic but my kids are going to SF/Big Sur Sonoma late Aug.
Any must sees beer/winery wise?
Checked into music can't find anything happenin tho.
thanks for any ideas Jake
Anchor Steam brewery tour ( if they can get reservations)
Pyramid brewery over in Berkeley also has tours.
Nevermind all that...how much scratch are you giving the
kids for the trip?...I'm available to tour guide.
Let me know.
They have my credit card so no medicinal marijuana charges unless they get the drops for me.they will be in Yosemite then Big Sur then SF.Yeah they like alot of the indie stuff but would check out something on my rec.any good local bands?anchor is a good idea they were talkin bout Lagunitas too thanks for the help
Randy G
2013-08-16 20:10:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by ***@comcast.net
They have my credit card so no medicinal marijuana charges unless they get the drops for me.they will be in Yosemite then Big Sur then SF.Yeah they like alot of the indie stuff but would check out something on my rec.any good local bands?anchor is a good idea they were talkin bout Lagunitas too thanks for the help
I loved Lagunitas. Marin Brewing is good, so is Moylan's. The drive up to Russian River Brewing is worth it if you like sours and IPAs.
sweetbac
2013-08-17 00:35:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by ***@comcast.net
Yeah they like alot of the indie stuff but would check out something on my
rec.
any good local bands?
When are they in SF?
Randy G
2013-08-16 20:07:08 UTC
Permalink
Have you been to 21st Amendment? They have a pretty good presence here, but not sure about their beers.
frndthdevl
2013-08-17 06:17:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Randy G
Have you been to 21st Amendment? They have a pretty good presence here, but not sure about their beers.
Alpine did their 7th Anniversary beer this year. I think I let Sourbrah know about it but ................I think I let him know about Alpine's 25th Toronado Anniversary beer Double Nelson. But at 8.88 that is beyond the pale for him I am sure.
B
2013-08-17 03:54:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by sweetbac
Post by j***@gmail.com
Dave, off topic but my kids are going to SF/Big Sur Sonoma late Aug.
Any must sees beer/winery wise?
Checked into music can't find anything happenin tho.
thanks for any ideas Jake
Anchor Steam brewery tour ( if they can get reservations)
Pyramid brewery over in Berkeley also has tours.
Nevermind all that...how much scratch are you giving the
kids for the trip?...I'm available to tour guide.
Let me know.
<shiver>

"The Wharf Rat Tour", see the seedy underbelly of the original but now
decayed Rice-a-Roni factory all the while learning about a supposed new San
Francisco treat, heffen-roni. The best $0.25 you'll ever spend. - Dave
Kelly

Or...there's always http://www.terrapincrossroads.net/events/
the wharf rat
2013-08-17 06:32:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by B
"The Wharf Rat Tour", see the seedy underbelly of the original but now
decayed Rice-a-Roni factory all the while learning about a supposed new San
Francisco treat, heffen-roni. The best $0.25 you'll ever spend. - Dave
And afterwards you all get up and fly away!
j***@gmail.com
2013-08-16 21:27:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by sweetbac
Was at the liquor store yesterday...saw a 4 pack of that
Boulevard Brewery Farmhouse 7 Ale...a 4 pack...12 ounce bottles.
$12.99
You fucking kiddin' me?...how much does this shit cost to produce?
The beer is phenominal...that aint the point...why do they price themselves
out of the game like that?
Oh...i HAVE the bread..feel me....that aint the point...
I aint paying $14 something for 4 bottles of NO g'damn beer.
I ended up buying a 12 pack of that Redhook IPA for $10.99.
THATS more like it, Cheif.
Now WHO'S yo daddy!
thanks. like laginitas will check boylans and marin
sweetbac
2013-08-25 21:33:39 UTC
Permalink
A very good beer weekend....
some Lagunitas IPA....Franziskaners...
and today bought a 6'er of the phenominal "Prohibition Ale" from
Speakeasy Brewery outta SF...$6.99/cold...can't beat that with a stick.
Band Beyond Desu
2013-08-26 00:11:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by sweetbac
A very good beer weekend....
some Lagunitas IPA....Franziskaners...
and today bought a 6'er of the phenominal "Prohibition Ale" from
Speakeasy Brewery outta SF...$6.99/cold...can't beat that with a stick.
It's amazing you find the time to post! ### Buurrrp.
Band Beyond Desu
2013-08-26 00:18:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Band Beyond Desu
Post by sweetbac
A very good beer weekend....
some Lagunitas IPA....Franziskaners...
and today bought a 6'er of the phenominal "Prohibition Ale" from
Speakeasy Brewery outta SF...$6.99/cold...can't beat that with a stick.
It's amazing you find the time to post! ### Buurrrp.
<stares>

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