Discussion:
The Best 70s "Country-Rock"
(too old to reply)
CaesarD
2004-02-17 20:58:14 UTC
Permalink
Listening to the latest 3 remastered Marshall Tucker Band CD reissues
(Where We All Belong, Searchin For A Rainbow, and Long Hard Ride) I
was struck by how fresh they all sound. And it got me to thinking
about why that is. The great thing about The Marshall Tucker Band (at
least until the death of guitarist Toy Caldwell) was not only the way
they drew from varied musical styles (country, blues, rock,
bluegrass--all the great music the Dead drew from and used in their
musical gumbo too) but it's the way it was put together. And the songs
themselves. There were many great "country rock bands" in the 70s (and
certainly the rebirth, albeit in a different way, of alt.country in
the 90s and the 00s is just as fresh) but how many put out AS MANY
top-notch albums as MTB? Some people dismiss them as just another
Southern Rock band. How crazy. These records are up there with the
Byrds "Sweethearts Of The Rodeo," Poco's "Crazy Eyes," and the Eagles
"One Of These Nights."

Anyone else have a favorite 70s country-rock band?
Dave Kelly
2004-02-17 21:07:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by CaesarD
Listening to the latest 3 remastered Marshall Tucker Band CD reissues
(Where We All Belong, Searchin For A Rainbow, and Long Hard Ride) I
was struck by how fresh they all sound.
indeed...I peeped the re-isshes at amoeba on Haight.
I have "rainbow" & "Where we all belong"
I think their best is "A new Life" also re-issued
how is "LHR"?
They also released a live album from '76 that I gotta pick up.
LOVE me some Tucker.
http://www.spincds.com/marshallt.html
karmakaze
2004-02-17 22:58:09 UTC
Permalink
"Dave Kelly" <***@pacbell.net> wrote

\ I have "rainbow" & "Where we all belong"
\ I think their best is "A new Life" also re-issued, how is "LHR"?

All good.

\ They also released a live album from '76 that I gotta pick up.

YES YES YES!! It is soooo awesome (all new except two tracks are from
the double live/studio LP "Where We All Belong" and one track is from the
first Charlie Daniels Volunteer Jam release. Funny story about the V.Jam
album, the back cover features a map of the area around Murfreesboro and
me and my buds being heavily into the Commander, notice a little open dot
on the map labeled "Ozone" and as we were driving down to FL for spring
break we decided to drop by and experience Ozone, Tennessee. Finally
got there at 3:00 a.m. (not much to the town beyond a few houses, a post
office and a Boy Scout camp ("Camp Ozone"). Woohoo.Anyway...do
pick up this live Marshall Tucker release, _This Ol' Cowboy_ is so sweet.

Have a pozitive day,
TD


--
George McGovern, in The Nation:

"Thanks to the most crudely partisan decision in the history of the
Supreme Court, the nation has been given a President of painfully
limited wisdom and compassion and lacking any sense of the nation's
true greatness. Appearing to enjoy his role as Commander in Chief of
the armed forces above all other functions of his office, and unchecked
by a seemingly timid Congress, a compliant Supreme Court, a largely
subservient press and a corrupt corporate plutocracy, George W. Bush
has set the nation on a course for one-man rule."

http://www.thenation.com/doc.mhtml?i=20030421&s=mcgovern
Chuck Gregg
2004-02-17 21:10:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by CaesarD
Listening to the latest 3 remastered Marshall Tucker Band CD reissues
(Where We All Belong, Searchin For A Rainbow, and Long Hard Ride) I
was struck by how fresh they all sound. And it got me to thinking
about why that is. The great thing about The Marshall Tucker Band (at
least until the death of guitarist Toy Caldwell) was not only the way
they drew from varied musical styles (country, blues, rock,
bluegrass--all the great music the Dead drew from and used in their
musical gumbo too) but it's the way it was put together. And the songs
themselves. There were many great "country rock bands" in the 70s (and
certainly the rebirth, albeit in a different way, of alt.country in
the 90s and the 00s is just as fresh) but how many put out AS MANY
top-notch albums as MTB? Some people dismiss them as just another
Southern Rock band. How crazy. These records are up there with the
Byrds "Sweethearts Of The Rodeo," Poco's "Crazy Eyes," and the Eagles
"One Of These Nights."
Anyone else have a favorite 70s country-rock band?
Molly Hatchett.
JYOB
2004-02-17 21:31:57 UTC
Permalink
The James Gang.....

The old geezer
Jperdue4
2004-02-17 21:54:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by JYOB
The James Gang.....
The old geezer
The James Gang was not country rock...
Jonp
JYOB
2004-02-17 22:39:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by JYOB
The James Gang.....
Post by JYOB
The old geezer
The James Gang was not country rock...
Jonp
:-)
j***@verizon.net
2004-02-19 17:46:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by JYOB
The James Gang.....
Post by JYOB
The old geezer
Elvin Bishop/Marshall Tucker @ The Orpheum was a fine Country-Rock show I
saw in the 70's
Paulie Ross
2004-02-20 02:46:13 UTC
Permalink
Interesting enough, I heard on the radio today some Manasas with Stephen
Stills. Pretty good shit. I haven't put it on the player in a long time.
Though Stills is overrated, this era was probably his best.

Paulie
See my CDR list at:

http://hometown.aol.com/pkross00/myhomepage/index.html
Joe
2004-02-17 21:44:45 UTC
Permalink
New Riders of the Purple Sage

Joe


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Steve Lenier
2004-02-18 08:15:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Joe
New Riders of the Purple Sage
Joe
that's the one that came to my mind too.

Steve
www.lenier.com
www.stevelenier.com
Jperdue4
2004-02-17 21:53:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chuck Gregg
Post by CaesarD
Listening to the latest 3 remastered Marshall Tucker Band CD reissues
(Where We All Belong, Searchin For A Rainbow, and Long Hard Ride) I
was struck by how fresh they all sound. And it got me to thinking
about why that is. The great thing about The Marshall Tucker Band (at
least until the death of guitarist Toy Caldwell) was not only the way
they drew from varied musical styles (country, blues, rock,
bluegrass--all the great music the Dead drew from and used in their
musical gumbo too) but it's the way it was put together. And the songs
themselves. There were many great "country rock bands" in the 70s (and
certainly the rebirth, albeit in a different way, of alt.country in
the 90s and the 00s is just as fresh) but how many put out AS MANY
top-notch albums as MTB? Some people dismiss them as just another
Southern Rock band. How crazy. These records are up there with the
Byrds "Sweethearts Of The Rodeo," Poco's "Crazy Eyes," and the Eagles
"One Of These Nights."
Anyone else have a favorite 70s country-rock band?
Molly Hatchett.
Molly Hatchet was not country rock...
JonP
Chuck Gregg
2004-02-17 22:01:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jperdue4
Post by Chuck Gregg
Post by CaesarD
Listening to the latest 3 remastered Marshall Tucker Band CD reissues
(Where We All Belong, Searchin For A Rainbow, and Long Hard Ride) I
was struck by how fresh they all sound. And it got me to thinking
about why that is. The great thing about The Marshall Tucker Band (at
least until the death of guitarist Toy Caldwell) was not only the way
they drew from varied musical styles (country, blues, rock,
bluegrass--all the great music the Dead drew from and used in their
musical gumbo too) but it's the way it was put together. And the songs
themselves. There were many great "country rock bands" in the 70s (and
certainly the rebirth, albeit in a different way, of alt.country in
the 90s and the 00s is just as fresh) but how many put out AS MANY
top-notch albums as MTB? Some people dismiss them as just another
Southern Rock band. How crazy. These records are up there with the
Byrds "Sweethearts Of The Rodeo," Poco's "Crazy Eyes," and the Eagles
"One Of These Nights."
Anyone else have a favorite 70s country-rock band?
Molly Hatchett.
Molly Hatchet was not country rock...
JonP
I disagree, Jon. That was *definately* country rock. No different than .38
Special in my book.
Matthew Blankman
2004-02-17 23:59:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chuck Gregg
Post by Jperdue4
Molly Hatchet was not country rock...
JonP
I disagree, Jon. That was *definately* country rock. No different than .38
Special in my book.
Molly Hatchet and .38 Special are Southern Rock, not Country Rock. I know
it's a bit silly to be so parochial, but still...

Marshall Tucker Band were so great because they also had that jazz feeling.
Paul Riddle's drumming was really jazzy and it took songs into really cool
spaces. I would say MTB were a lot more than just country rock...in fact
they really fit Gram Parsons idea of "Cosmic American Music"--healthy doses
of country, blues, jazz and good ol' rock'n'roll.

Matt
Jperdue4
2004-02-18 00:57:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Matthew Blankman
Post by Chuck Gregg
Post by Jperdue4
Molly Hatchet was not country rock...
JonP
I disagree, Jon. That was *definately* country rock. No different than
.38
Post by Chuck Gregg
Special in my book.
Molly Hatchet and .38 Special are Southern Rock, not Country Rock. I know
it's a bit silly to be so parochial, but still...
Marshall Tucker Band were so great because they also had that jazz feeling.
Paul Riddle's drumming was really jazzy and it took songs into really cool
spaces. I would say MTB were a lot more than just country rock...in fact
they really fit Gram Parsons idea of "Cosmic American Music"--healthy doses
of country, blues, jazz and good ol' rock'n'roll.
Matt
Wow, Matt your response was exactly what i was going to say...
JonP
Chuck Gregg
2004-02-18 15:57:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jperdue4
Post by Matthew Blankman
Post by Chuck Gregg
Post by Jperdue4
Molly Hatchet was not country rock...
JonP
I disagree, Jon. That was *definately* country rock. No different than
.38
Post by Chuck Gregg
Special in my book.
Molly Hatchet and .38 Special are Southern Rock, not Country Rock. I know
it's a bit silly to be so parochial, but still...
Marshall Tucker Band were so great because they also had that jazz feeling.
Paul Riddle's drumming was really jazzy and it took songs into really cool
spaces. I would say MTB were a lot more than just country rock...in fact
they really fit Gram Parsons idea of "Cosmic American Music"--healthy doses
of country, blues, jazz and good ol' rock'n'roll.
Matt
Wow, Matt your response was exactly what i was going to say...
JonP
Huh. I guess I cannot distnguish between the South and "Country". Which is
fine, I suppose. Both being wastelands and all....
Greg
2004-02-18 01:41:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Matthew Blankman
Post by Chuck Gregg
Post by Jperdue4
Molly Hatchet was not country rock...
JonP
I disagree, Jon. That was *definately* country rock. No different than
.38
Post by Chuck Gregg
Special in my book.
Molly Hatchet and .38 Special are Southern Rock, not Country Rock. I know
it's a bit silly to be so parochial, but still...
Marshall Tucker Band were so great because they also had that jazz feeling.
Paul Riddle's drumming was really jazzy and it took songs into really cool
spaces. I would say MTB were a lot more than just country rock...in fact
they really fit Gram Parsons idea of "Cosmic American Music"--healthy doses
of country, blues, jazz and good ol' rock'n'roll.
Don't know how you want to classify them, but they're somewhere in or
around this vein, and I love 'em: Little Feat!


--
Greg
phobos78-marslink-net
Replace dashes and move in by 1 planet to reply.
Massiedi
2004-02-17 22:04:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by CaesarD
These records are up there with the
Post by CaesarD
Byrds "Sweethearts Of The Rodeo," Poco's "Crazy Eyes," and the Eagles
"One Of These Nights."
MTB waaayyy better than Poco
Post by CaesarD
Post by CaesarD
Anyone else have a favorite 70s country-rock band?
The Grateful Dead
Olompali4
2004-02-17 22:12:05 UTC
Permalink
Anyone else have a favorite 70s country-rock band?<
Flying Burrito Bros.
DBrophy479
2004-02-17 23:37:17 UTC
Permalink
I guess The Band goes without saying.
Skynard did a few countryish tunes.(Not that I like much of their music.)
But the Outlaws,Molly Hatchett,and .38 Special "country rock"? Anything I ever
heard by them sounder closer to AC/DC than Hank Williams on the country-rock
flow chart.
I think the greatest overlooked band in this genre was The Dillards.They
started using drums,electric bass and guitar,etc,on their bluegrass/folk
records a few years before Dylan and The Byrds "went country." Their 70's album
"Roots And Branches" is a masterpiece.
Other great 70's country-rock albums: The Everly Brothers and Rick Nelson.
Marshall Tucker had some great tunes.Ever notice that Doug Gray's voice is
similar to Boz Scaggs?
the great greggiler
2004-02-18 01:24:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by DBrophy479
But the Outlaws,Molly Hatchett,and .38 Special "country rock"?
Didnt the outlaws do the song green grass and high tides? if so then thats
definatly a country song. and im sure they had a few more. but there best was
ghost riders in the sky
long live the freaks
greg the giggling wonder llama


Remember when the chips are down, the buffalo is empty

Im off to the village to see a man about a yak.
Jperdue4
2004-02-18 01:57:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by the great greggiler
Post by DBrophy479
But the Outlaws,Molly Hatchett,and .38 Special "country rock"?
Didnt the outlaws do the song green grass and high tides? if so then thats
definatly a country song.
lol..(shakes head in disbelief)...
Jonp
JimK
2004-02-18 05:26:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jperdue4
Post by Chuck Gregg
Post by CaesarD
Listening to the latest 3 remastered Marshall Tucker Band CD reissues
(Where We All Belong, Searchin For A Rainbow, and Long Hard Ride) I
was struck by how fresh they all sound. And it got me to thinking
about why that is. The great thing about The Marshall Tucker Band (at
least until the death of guitarist Toy Caldwell) was not only the way
they drew from varied musical styles (country, blues, rock,
bluegrass--all the great music the Dead drew from and used in their
musical gumbo too) but it's the way it was put together. And the songs
themselves. There were many great "country rock bands" in the 70s (and
certainly the rebirth, albeit in a different way, of alt.country in
the 90s and the 00s is just as fresh) but how many put out AS MANY
top-notch albums as MTB? Some people dismiss them as just another
Southern Rock band. How crazy. These records are up there with the
Byrds "Sweethearts Of The Rodeo," Poco's "Crazy Eyes," and the Eagles
"One Of These Nights."
Anyone else have a favorite 70s country-rock band?
Molly Hatchett.
Molly Hatchet was not country rock...
JonP
Yeah, but were they psychedelic is the question.

JimK
Paulie Ross
2004-02-18 13:35:22 UTC
Permalink
The Byrds-Sweethearts of the Rodeo
Willie Nelson/Leon Ruessell's album
GP-Graham Parsons


See my CDR list at:

http://hometown.aol.com/pkross00/myhomepage/index.html
Andy Gefen
2004-02-18 22:04:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Paulie Ross
The Byrds-Sweethearts of the Rodeo
Willie Nelson/Leon Ruessell's album
GP-Graham Parsons
Nobody has pointed out the Flying Burrito Brothers yet???

-- Andy (remove z's to respond)
Steve McHenry
2004-02-18 23:40:55 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 18 Feb 2004 17:04:24 -0500, Andy Gefen
Post by Andy Gefen
Post by Paulie Ross
The Byrds-Sweethearts of the Rodeo
Willie Nelson/Leon Ruessell's album
GP-Graham Parsons
Nobody has pointed out the Flying Burrito Brothers yet???
Why yes, I believe I did.


S
Steve McHenry
2004-02-17 22:10:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by CaesarD
Anyone else have a favorite 70s country-rock band?
Pure Prairie League put out some real nice music, including the
wonderful "I'll Change Your Flat Tire, Merle."

Commander Cody

New Riders (of course)

early Eagles

early Emmylou Harris

Flying Burrito Brothers


steve
Dolphyzap
2004-02-17 22:16:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by CaesarD
Listening to the latest 3 remastered Marshall Tucker Band CD reissues
(Where We All Belong, Searchin For A Rainbow, and Long Hard Ride) I
was struck by how fresh they all sound. And it got me to thinking
about why that is. The great thing about The Marshall Tucker Band (at
least until the death of guitarist Toy Caldwell) was not only the way
they drew from varied musical styles (country, blues, rock,
bluegrass--all the great music the Dead drew from and used in their
musical gumbo too) but it's the way it was put together. And the songs
themselves. There were many great "country rock bands" in the 70s (and
certainly the rebirth, albeit in a different way, of alt.country in
the 90s and the 00s is just as fresh) but how many put out AS MANY
top-notch albums as MTB? Some people dismiss them as just another
Southern Rock band. How crazy. These records are up there with the
Byrds "Sweethearts Of The Rodeo," Poco's "Crazy Eyes," and the Eagles
"One Of These Nights."
Anyone else have a favorite 70s country-rock band?
Gram Parsons with the James Burton/Ronnie Tutt anchored band he recorded with
for GP and (especially) Grievous Angel

Commander Cody & His Lost Planet Airmen

Asleep At The Wheel
Ken Fortenberry
2004-02-17 22:41:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dolphyzap
...
Asleep At The Wheel
Wonderful stuff, some of my favorite "cruisin' down the road" tunes,
but it's Western Swing and nowhere near what I'd call "Country Rock".
--
Ken Fortenberry
karmakaze
2004-02-17 22:48:11 UTC
Permalink
"Dolphyzap" <***@aol.comrade> wrote

\>Anyone else have a favorite 70s country-rock band?
\
\ Commander Cody & His Lost Planet Airmen
\ Asleep At The Wheel

These two are Western-swing bands, not country rock.

Good call on Poco, Pure Prarie League and especially NRPS.

I wouls also add the Outlaws (and, why not) Lyryd Syknrd.

Have a positive day,
TD


--
I don't stay out late,
Don't care to go.
I'm home about eight,
Just me and my radio.

-- Fats Waller/A. Razaf 1929
Steve McHenry
2004-02-17 23:33:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by karmakaze
\>Anyone else have a favorite 70s country-rock band?
\
\ Commander Cody & His Lost Planet Airmen
\ Asleep At The Wheel
These two are Western-swing bands, not country rock.
Agree on AATW, but the Commander was definitely country-rock.

While Commander Cody swung with the best of them, they could also rock
out.

Hell, their records had their own distinctive style that really defied
labels, blending rock, hard-core country truck-driving songs, swing,
cajun, gypsy, etc.

Damn, it't time to get me to Amazon and order some Commander Cody
discs.

Anybody got any live?


steve
karmakaze
2004-02-18 00:06:02 UTC
Permalink
\ >"Dolphyzap" <***@aol.comrade> wrote
\ >
\ >\>Anyone else have a favorite 70s country-rock band?
\ >\
\ >\ Commander Cody & His Lost Planet Airmen
\ >\ Asleep At The Wheel
\ >
\ >These two are Western-swing bands, not country rock.
\
\ Agree on AATW, but the Commander was definitely country-rock.
\
\ While Commander Cody swung with the best of them, they could
\ also rock out. Hell, their records had their own distinctive style that
\ really defied labels, blending rock, hard-core country truck-driving
\ songs, swing, cajun, gypsy, etc.

I happily concede your point!

\ Damn, it't time to get me to Amazon and order some Commander
\ Cody discs.

If you don't have "We Got A Live One Here!" and "Hot Licks, Cold
Steel and Truckers' Favorites" I'd recommend those first. "Live From
Armadillo World Headquarters" is pretty darn good as well.

\ Anybody got any live? steve

3/1/70 Family Dog SF 60 min w/GD 3/1/70 filler (NSB >> MAMU)
1974 GAMH, SF 90 min
10/23/85 Graffiti, Pittsburgh PA 135 min
All soundboard-sourced, all still on analog (not yet digitized)

H.a.p.d.,
TD

--
Just sing out a Te Deum
When you see that I.C.B.M.,
And the party will be "come as you are!"
-- Tom Lehrer
JC Martin
2004-02-18 17:55:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by karmakaze
\>Anyone else have a favorite 70s country-rock band?
\
\ Commander Cody & His Lost Planet Airmen
\ Asleep At The Wheel
These two are Western-swing bands, not country rock.
Good call on Poco, Pure Prarie League and especially NRPS.
I wouls also add the Outlaws (and, why not) Lyryd Syknrd.
I'm a Charlie Daniels Band man myself. Put me in for Jerry Reed's swamp
funk rock sides as well.

Anyone heard of the Drive-By Truckers? They're a fairly new indie DIY
post-southern rock band. Their new CD, "Decoration Day" is a brilliant
recording by my estimation.

-JC
johnny fever
2004-02-21 05:28:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by JC Martin
I'm a Charlie Daniels Band man myself. Put me in for Jerry Reed's swamp
funk rock sides as well.
Anyone heard of the Drive-By Truckers? They're a fairly new indie DIY
post-southern rock band. Their new CD, "Decoration Day" is a brilliant
recording by my estimation.
-JC
I'm with Ya JC. Just played some Charlie Daniels vinyl last week and
remembered its hard driven FUNK-ROCK/ABB sounds combined with very
tight playing.

Someone also mentioned Lowell George?/ Lil Feat- They SMOKED!!!

Speakin of smokin, am herfin' down a C.A.O. anniverary right now.
SCHWEET!!!

J. Fever

P. S. Don't get into a game of "name that tune" with Warren Haynes.
Ken Fortenberry
2004-02-17 22:46:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by CaesarD
...
Anyone else have a favorite 70s country-rock band?
Pure Prairie League.
--
Ken Fortenberry
Mark
2004-02-17 22:55:14 UTC
Permalink
Date: 2/17/2004 5:46 PM Eastern Standard Time
Post by CaesarD
...
Anyone else have a favorite 70s country-rock band?
Pure Prairie League.
Anyone remember the Pousette-Dart Band? They were like our house band at URI
in the late '70s.

God I'm so old....

Mark
Lazzaro9
2004-02-17 23:03:18 UTC
Permalink
How about The Eagles. They aren't quite as "country" as Marshall Tucker etc,
but that stuff is more Southern than Country to me -
I don't care for the Southern stuff, but The Eagles were superb
folk,country,rock in the early albums.
Try "Desperado", the debut album "Eagles" (w Take it Easy, Eagle flying over
desert on cover).
After those albums they get a little disco-ish and pop-rock.
Many Country stars even did an Eagles tribute album w Willie Nelson covering
"Take It to the Limit"
tim the squirrel
2004-02-17 23:49:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lazzaro9
How about The Eagles. They aren't quite as "country" as Marshall Tucker etc,
but that stuff is more Southern than Country to me -
I don't care for the Southern stuff, but The Eagles were superb
folk,country,rock in the early albums.
Try "Desperado", the debut album "Eagles" (w Take it Easy, Eagle flying over
desert on cover).
After those albums they get a little disco-ish and pop-rock.
Many Country stars even did an Eagles tribute album w Willie Nelson covering
"Take It to the Limit"
nobody's mentioned The Band yet.

The Band!

definitive country rock if there is such a thing.

Gram Parsons also begs a mention. Grievous Angel is a fabulous album.

tim the squirrel
brew ziggins
2004-02-18 13:30:49 UTC
Permalink
While they're not normally thought of as such I nominate
The Rolling Stones, for songs such as:

Let It Bleed
Sweet Virginia
Love in Vain
Far Away Eyes
You Got the Silver
Factory Girl
No Expectations
Dead Flowers
Country Honk
--
submarines are lurking in my foggy ceiling
they keep me sleepless at night...


l bruce higgins ithaca new york
lbh2 at cornell dot edu
Matthew Blankman
2004-02-18 13:48:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by brew ziggins
While they're not normally thought of as such I nominate
Let It Bleed
Sweet Virginia
Love in Vain
Far Away Eyes
You Got the Silver
Factory Girl
No Expectations
Dead Flowers
Country Honk
--
While the Stones certainly can't be pigeonholed as a "country-rock" band,
their excursions into country (like those listed above) probably had a lot
more impact on the alt.country bands of the '90s than any of the other bands
we've listed here. But Bruce, you forgot Torn & Frayed and Dear Doctor.

Matt
Olompali4
2004-02-18 14:06:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Matthew Blankman
hile the Stones certainly can't be pigeonholed as a "country-rock" band,
their excursions into country (like those listed above) probably had a lot
more impact on the alt.country bands of the '90s than any of the other bands<
Get the two Golden Smog cds!

Also let's not forget the incredible influence Gram Parsons had on The Stones.
Neil Krueger
2004-02-18 18:00:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by brew ziggins
While they're not normally thought of as such I nominate
Let It Bleed
Sweet Virginia
Love in Vain
Far Away Eyes
You Got the Silver
Factory Girl
No Expectations
Dead Flowers
Country Honk
This thread has been revelatory. I've never been a country music fan, and
country-rock acts like NRPS and Lynrd Skynrd have always bored me to tears.
But indeed, it turns out there are country rock songs that I like, including
all of the Stones songs above.

And I love the Band, one of my favorite acts. Whenever we saw them live,
Rick Danko looked like he enjoyed playing music more than any other musician
I've ever seen--he just looked so damn happy on stage. Are the Band really
"country-rock"?

And someone mentioned Little Feat, another of my favorite bands. They
really don't seem like country rock to me. What about Michelle Shocked?

Peace,
Neil X.
Olompali4
2004-02-18 18:07:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Neil Krueger
I've ever seen--he just looked so damn happy on stage. Are the Band really
"country-rock"?
More honky tonk barrelhouse than country.
Post by Neil Krueger
And someone mentioned Little Feat, another of my favorite bands. They
really don't seem like country rock to me.<
Dixie funk via L.A.
Post by Neil Krueger
What about Michelle Shocked?
Skate punk folk rocker.
Sting
2004-02-19 00:37:40 UTC
Permalink
My take.

Emmylou Harris,The Byrds,Dylan,Flying Burrito Brothers,Rick Nelson,
Nitty Gritty Dirt Band-Gram Parsons, Gene Parsons, Pure Prairie Leauge,
Linda Ronstadt-Buffalo Springfield, Heart and Flowers, Dillards,
Nicheal Nesmith, Eagles, Commander Cody and the Lost Planet Airmen,
Nashville West,

Plus I think you gotta add even though more on the County Side.

Buck Owens and the Buckaroo's with the legendary Don Rich
and some of Merle Haggard's stuff with Roy Nichols and
James Burton with the bakersfield telecaster, and anything
Clarence White touched.

and I'm sure there are alot more.

Stick
Jason Michael
2004-02-19 14:29:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sting
My take.
Emmylou Harris,The Byrds,Dylan,Flying Burrito Brothers,Rick Nelson,
Nitty Gritty Dirt Band-Gram Parsons, Gene Parsons, Pure Prairie Leauge,
Linda Ronstadt-Buffalo Springfield, Heart and Flowers, Dillards,
Nicheal Nesmith, Eagles, Commander Cody and the Lost Planet Airmen,
Nashville West,
Plus I think you gotta add even though more on the County Side.
Buck Owens and the Buckaroo's with the legendary Don Rich
and some of Merle Haggard's stuff with Roy Nichols and
James Burton with the bakersfield telecaster, and anything
Clarence White touched.
and I'm sure there are alot more.
Stick
Johnny Cash? He's gotta be one of the most influential.

Jason
Frndthdevl
2004-02-19 15:29:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sting
Buck Owens and the Buckaroo's with the legendary Don Rich
and some of Merle Haggard's stuff with Roy Nichols and
James Burton with the bakersfield telecaster, and anything
Clarence White touched.
All of the above true country and musical legends. SO unlike that pap,er I mean
pop they call Country today. But country rock? IDTS,YMMV.

What is kind of amazing is the country rock movement pioneered by the "hippie"
leaning folk, inspired a true movement in the oh so incestuous and closed doors
of Nashville. The Outlaw movement,by Waylon,Willie and the boys changed the way
,well in a small way,how music was made in Nashville. and they are still so
pissed about it they gave us country pop. LOL
peace
jeff
"put another log on the fire"
Jperdue4
2004-02-18 20:36:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Neil Krueger
This thread has been revelatory. I've never been a country music fan, and
country-rock acts like NRPS and Lynrd Skynrd have always bored me to tears.
Nrps, yes country rock...Lynyrd Skynyrd is NOT "country rock".....I hate the
term "southern rock" but thats what they are if anything....
Joe
2004-02-23 05:41:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mark
God I'm so old....
Old or unevolved?


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Mark
2004-02-23 13:08:51 UTC
Permalink
Date: 2/23/2004 12:41 AM Eastern Standard Time
Post by Mark
God I'm so old....
Old or unevolved?
Amazingly, I manage to muddle through the day while remaining upright most of
the time.

Mark
Neil Krueger
2004-02-23 18:09:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mark
Date: 2/23/2004 12:41 AM Eastern Standard Time
Post by Mark
God I'm so old....
Old or unevolved?
Amazingly, I manage to muddle through the day while remaining upright most of
the time.
Mark
Yeah, but all that hair on your knuckles is a bit disturbing.

Peace,
Neil X.
Mark
2004-02-23 19:48:31 UTC
Permalink
Date: 2/23/2004 1:09 PM Eastern Standard Time
Post by Mark
Date: 2/23/2004 12:41 AM Eastern Standard Time
Post by Mark
God I'm so old....
Old or unevolved?
Amazingly, I manage to muddle through the day while remaining upright most
of
Post by Mark
the time.
Mark
Yeah, but all that hair on your knuckles is a bit disturbing.
What can I say, dragging them on the ground only makes it grow in thicker.

Mark
Jperdue4
2004-02-23 20:19:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Neil Krueger
Post by Mark
Date: 2/23/2004 12:41 AM Eastern Standard Time
Post by Mark
God I'm so old....
Old or unevolved?
Amazingly, I manage to muddle through the day while remaining upright most
of
Post by Mark
the time.
Mark
Yeah, but all that hair on your knuckles is a bit disturbing.
Peace,
Neil X.
I had the profound pleasure of meeting Michael Stipe at the athens music
festival in 1988, and when we shook hands he looked at mine and said,"You have
hair on the side of your hands like mine"
:)
JonP

Matthew Blankman
2004-02-18 00:02:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ken Fortenberry
Post by CaesarD
...
Anyone else have a favorite 70s country-rock band?
Pure Prairie League.
That first album of theirs, "Bustin' Out," is really very very good, and
underrated. Everyone knows Aimee, but the whole album is good. Angel #9
sounds like it could be a Son Volt song.

Matt
Tom
2004-02-23 19:43:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Matthew Blankman
Post by Ken Fortenberry
Post by CaesarD
...
Anyone else have a favorite 70s country-rock band?
Pure Prairie League.
That first album of theirs, "Bustin' Out," is really very very good, and
underrated. Everyone knows Aimee, but the whole album is good. Angel #9
sounds like it could be a Son Volt song.
Matt
PPL had some great music in their 15 plus 11 LP career. BUSTIN' OUT, a
classic , was actually their second release after their self titled
debut and features Craig Fuller. The TWO LANE HIGHWAY LP from '75,
their third LP , was also an all time country rock classic.In fact it
was responsible for BUSTIN OUT and the single AIMEE being resurrected
almost three years after it's release and Craig Fuller's departure.
They had a phenomenal pedal steel player in John David Call who
frequently played a "twin lead" with Larry Goshorn and was just
incredible, especially in concert.Great stuff. A hard to find CD but
well worth the effort was their LIVE ! TAKIN" THE STAGE release from
'77. FIRIN' UP , with a young Vince Gill on lead guitars and vocals
was another nice effort. These guys put on some great shows. The
country rock music from the 70's, Tucker, Poco, etc was a great time
in music ! I still listen to this music frequently today.

Tom
marklaw
2004-02-17 23:47:44 UTC
Permalink
HEARTSFIELD
Post by CaesarD
Listening to the latest 3 remastered Marshall Tucker Band CD reissues
(Where We All Belong, Searchin For A Rainbow, and Long Hard Ride) I
was struck by how fresh they all sound. And it got me to thinking
about why that is. The great thing about The Marshall Tucker Band (at
least until the death of guitarist Toy Caldwell) was not only the way
they drew from varied musical styles (country, blues, rock,
bluegrass--all the great music the Dead drew from and used in their
musical gumbo too) but it's the way it was put together. And the songs
themselves. There were many great "country rock bands" in the 70s (and
certainly the rebirth, albeit in a different way, of alt.country in
the 90s and the 00s is just as fresh) but how many put out AS MANY
top-notch albums as MTB? Some people dismiss them as just another
Southern Rock band. How crazy. These records are up there with the
Byrds "Sweethearts Of The Rodeo," Poco's "Crazy Eyes," and the Eagles
"One Of These Nights."
Anyone else have a favorite 70s country-rock band?
karmakaze
2004-02-17 23:53:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by marklaw
HEARTSFIELD
McKendree Spring.

have a definitively positive day,
TD


--
"Restriction of free thought and free speech is the
most dangerous of all subversions. It is the one
un-American act that could most easily defeat us."
--Justice William O. Douglas
Roger
2004-02-18 04:17:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by CaesarD
Listening to the latest 3 remastered Marshall Tucker Band CD reissues
(Where We All Belong, Searchin For A Rainbow, and Long Hard Ride) I
was struck by how fresh they all sound. And it got me to thinking
about why that is. The great thing about The Marshall Tucker Band (at
least until the death of guitarist Toy Caldwell) was not only the way
they drew from varied musical styles (country, blues, rock,
bluegrass--all the great music the Dead drew from and used in their
musical gumbo too) but it's the way it was put together. And the songs
themselves. There were many great "country rock bands" in the 70s (and
certainly the rebirth, albeit in a different way, of alt.country in
the 90s and the 00s is just as fresh) but how many put out AS MANY
top-notch albums as MTB? Some people dismiss them as just another
Southern Rock band. How crazy. These records are up there with the
Byrds "Sweethearts Of The Rodeo," Poco's "Crazy Eyes," and the Eagles
"One Of These Nights."
Anyone else have a favorite 70s country-rock band?
The Byrds "Ballad of Easy Rider" was always a favorite of mine, and
under-rated as hell. The Eagles "Desperado" runs the gamut from
bluegrass to hard rock. Ozark Mountain Daredevils were very good as
well.

Roger
JimK
2004-02-18 05:37:17 UTC
Permalink
Leon Russell, Jesse Colin Young & Dickey Betts.

JimK
Matthew Blankman
2004-02-18 05:45:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Roger
The Byrds "Ballad of Easy Rider" was always a favorite of mine, and
under-rated as hell. The Eagles "Desperado" runs the gamut from
bluegrass to hard rock. Ozark Mountain Daredevils were very good as
well.
Roger
Ballad of Easy Rider is one of the great underrated albums of all-time,
regardless of genre. Oil In My Lamp! Gunga Din! Fido! Tulsa County! Great,
great album. (As is (Untitled))

Matt
Paul
2004-02-18 14:50:52 UTC
Permalink
Anyone else have a favorite 70s country-rock band?>>>>>>>>>>>
Yeah, Commander Cody and His Lost Planet Airmen. "Seeds and Stems" is
one fine country album.
southforkk
2004-02-18 16:07:17 UTC
Permalink
Anyone else have a favorite 70s country-rock band?>>>>>>>>>>>
Maybe more country folk than country rock, but I nominate John Prine.
HBOGAEV
2004-02-19 02:35:19 UTC
Permalink
Anyone who mentioned Gram Parsons (w/ The Byrds, FBBs and solo (including his
heartbreaking duets w/ Emmylou Harris) is on the right track. And his influence
on the Stones songs listed by another poster is almost undeniable...

In addition - James Burton, Jerry Lee Lewis (starting his country phase in the
early 60s and never sopping), Clarence White, Chris Hillman, Gene Clark, Gene
Parsons, and several others did more for "country rock" (a bad description for
a very good "style" of music which incorporated blues, r&b, rock&roll, straight
country and other genres) that The Marshall Tucker Band, the Outlaws, Molly
Hatchett, and other "southern rock" bands ever did.

And, as for the "progenitors" of country rock. let us not overlook: Hank
Williams, Sr. ("Move It On Over" being perhaps the FIRST country rock song
EVER); Buck Owens & the Buckaroos; Merle Haggard and his band; and, yes, the
late, great Elvis Presley (whose early 70s band included Ron Tutt, Glen D.
Hardin, James Burton (later used by Gram parsons on "GP" and "grievous Angel",
as well as comprising Emmylou harris' first "Hot Band")).

Jerry Garcia surely appreciated the work of most of the above (the FBBs had a
strong influence on the GDs early 70s "country rock" move) - GP, Clarence White
(whose flat-picking guitar style JG admired greatly), The Band (who definitely
were a "mix" of musical styles if there ever was one), and Lowell George (who
is remembered by GD fans as the producer of one of their more unfortunate late
70s recordings), whose mix of syncopated "dixie" music, blues, and COUNTRY
CREATED A large "CULT FOLLOWING" (not big on the music charts, but a critics'
favorite and still popular with their new line-up today). LFs legacy kinda
reminds me of the GDs.

And, although they are "classified" as "Southern rock", the ABB had some great
country "moments" (think of Dickey Betts' "Ramblin' Man")... And, in the "jam
band" genre, there was NEVER any group better than the original ABB - jams that
were totally melodic, very musically pleasing, incorporating elements of blues,
country, and jazz)...

AND, as for the Eagles, PURE COUNTRY/ROCK Pablum that reportedly made Gram
Parsons want to "puke."

Harry the Horse
cosmic1
2004-02-19 03:03:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by CaesarD
Anyone else have a favorite 70s country-rock band?
Neil Young.....................









Michael

"Arm Yourself When The Frog God Smiles"

Gowachin Admonition
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