Discussion:
what's the fav rock music among classical people and vice versa?
(too old to reply)
catastrophic success
2004-09-05 07:06:18 UTC
Permalink
do classical aficionados like pink floyd the wall?
Dylan Parry
2004-09-05 07:08:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by catastrophic success
do classical aficionados like pink floyd the wall?
I personally don't like The Wall, but it's all a matter of taste.
--
Dylan Parry
http://webpageworkshop.co.uk - FREE Web tutorials and references
La Donna Mobile
2004-09-05 10:38:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dylan Parry
Post by catastrophic success
do classical aficionados like pink floyd the wall?
I personally don't like The Wall, but it's all a matter of taste.
--
Dylan Parry
http://webpageworkshop.co.uk - FREE Web tutorials and references
You can't generalise about tastes. I am entirely indifferent to The Wall,
but have posted at length on hear about my rock/pop tastes.I am currently
playing my entire record collection (in alphabetical order) , with the
objective of finishing by my fortieth birthday. The next three rock/pop due
to be played are Sinead O'Connor's She Who Dwells..,Excel by 808 State and
Best Footie Anthems in the World. None of these are particularly amongst my
favourites.

I am also blogging the experience at http://www.madmusingsof.me.uk/weblog/
Scroll down and find various categories on the sidebar...
volkfolk
2004-09-05 13:20:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by catastrophic success
do classical aficionados like pink floyd the wall?
Not much classical influence in "The Wall" IMO.

Most of the classical guys who I know like bands like Yes, ELP, UK and
(early) Genesis

So far as the classical stuff that I listen to, I love Beethoveen, Motzart,
Bach. For the more modern stuff, I like guys like Debussey and Charles Ives.
Ives is someone who must have had a lot of influence on Phil, because he
used lots of polyphonic stuff his compositions. He has different melodies in
different keys happening simulataniously and fading in and out of each
other. Similar to the way "Anthem of The Sun" had stuff like that happening.

I suppose that Gershwin is really more jazz, but "Raphsody in Blue" and
"American in Paris" maybe the two greatest peices of 20th century American
music.
"Porgy and Bess" was pretty good too.

Scot
brew ziggins
2004-09-07 14:03:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by volkfolk
So far as the classical stuff that I listen to, I love Beethoveen, Motzart,
Bach. For the more modern stuff, I like guys like Debussey and Charles Ives.
Bartok rocks!!!!! Check out his piano concertos.
--
Lost my shape, trying to act casual
Can't stop, might end up in the hospital
~
l bruce higgins ithaca new york
lbh2 at cornell dot edu
Kelly Humphries <kpiscesatspeakeasydotnet@>
2004-09-08 16:58:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by brew ziggins
Post by volkfolk
So far as the classical stuff that I listen to, I love Beethoveen, Motzart,
Bach. For the more modern stuff, I like guys like Debussey and Charles Ives.
Bartok rocks!!!!! Check out his piano concertos.
I got a CD set of his string quartets from the library a while back,
and the only handle my brain could grab onto was: two-plus hours of
the soundtrack from "The Shining."

Not that there's anything wrong with that.

Bartok and piano, eh? Hmm, have to check that out....
Barry Goldwater
2004-09-09 21:05:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by volkfolk
Post by catastrophic success
do classical aficionados like pink floyd the wall?
Not much classical influence in "The Wall" IMO.
Most of the classical guys who I know like bands like Yes, ELP, UK and
(early) Genesis
BOR-ING. Mahavishnu Orchestra is the obvious choice.
EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)
2004-09-05 17:01:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by catastrophic success
do classical aficionados like pink floyd the wall?
Isn't it about time for school to start?
b s
2004-09-05 17:47:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)
Post by catastrophic success
do classical aficionados like pink floyd the wall?
Isn't it about time for school to start?
Only a couple more days of summer.
Daniel Kolle
2004-09-05 19:37:36 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 05 Sep 2004 10:01:38 -0700, "EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)"
Post by EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)
Post by catastrophic success
do classical aficionados like pink floyd the wall?
Isn't it about time for school to start?
Hey, it started for me two months ago.

--
-Daniel "Mr. Brevity" Kolle; 16 A.A. #2035
Koji Kondo, Yo-Yo Ma, Gustav Mahler, Krzysztof Penderecki, and Geirr Tveitt are my Gods.
Head of EAC Denial Department and Madly Insane Scientist.
Owain Sutton
2004-09-05 18:23:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by catastrophic success
do classical aficionados like pink floyd the wall?
Not if they take any pride in their elitism, they don't. :D
Tregembo
2004-09-06 03:31:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Owain Sutton
Post by catastrophic success
do classical aficionados like pink floyd the wall?
Not if they take any pride in their elitism, they don't. :D
First of all, "classical" is not a type of music. It's a period of
time/number of specific years of Serious music. Serious music runs from the
Baroque period (mid 1600's) through the Contemporary period (today).

Secondly, you don't create Serious influenced R & R just by adding an few
members of an orchestra or programming your synthesizer to sound like
violins.

Thirdly, since school's in, do a little homework.

Ray Arthur
Nightingale
2004-09-06 13:56:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tregembo
First of all, "classical" is not a type of music. It's a period of
time/number of specific years of Serious music. Serious music runs from the
Baroque period (mid 1600's) through the Contemporary period (today).
Interesting statement. On what basis do you claim that serious music
didn't start until the Baroque period?
Post by Tregembo
Secondly, you don't create Serious influenced R & R just by adding an few
members of an orchestra or programming your synthesizer to sound like
violins.
Thirdly, since school's in, do a little homework.
Ray Arthur
--
The better the voyce is, the meeter it is to honour and
serve God there-with: and the voyce of man is chiefely
to be imployed to that ende.

Omnis spiritus laudet Dominum.

-William Byrd
Governor Swill
2004-09-10 19:12:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nightingale
Post by Tregembo
First of all, "classical" is not a type of music. It's a period of
time/number of specific years of Serious music. Serious music runs from the
Baroque period (mid 1600's) through the Contemporary period (today).
Interesting statement. On what basis do you claim that serious music
didn't start until the Baroque period?
Perhaps 'serious' is a bad choice of word. In any case, until the
seventeenth century, what we might think of as 'classical music' was
actually elaborate church music. That's what the roots of classical
are anyway. Church music.

Bedwarmer
--
They never stop thinking about new ways to harm our conuntry
and our people and neither do we.
-- George W. Bush, at the White House, August 5, 2004
Dr.Matt
2004-09-10 19:15:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Governor Swill
Post by Nightingale
Post by Tregembo
First of all, "classical" is not a type of music. It's a period of
time/number of specific years of Serious music. Serious music runs from the
Baroque period (mid 1600's) through the Contemporary period (today).
Interesting statement. On what basis do you claim that serious music
didn't start until the Baroque period?
Perhaps 'serious' is a bad choice of word. In any case, until the
seventeenth century, what we might think of as 'classical music' was
actually elaborate church music. That's what the roots of classical
are anyway. Church music.
Bedwarmer
Is Dufay's "Fault d'Argent" (For the lack of silver) Church music?
--
Matthew H. Fields http://personal.www.umich.edu/~fields
Music: Splendor in Sound
To be great, do things better and better. Don't wait for talent: no such thing.
Brights have a naturalistic world-view. http://www.the-brights.net/
jeffc
2004-09-08 19:11:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tregembo
First of all, "classical" is not a type of music. It's a period of
time/number of specific years of Serious music. Serious music runs from the
Baroque period (mid 1600's) through the Contemporary period (today).
Secondly, you don't create Serious influenced R & R just by adding an few
members of an orchestra or programming your synthesizer to sound like
violins.
Thirdly, since school's in, do a little homework.
Sounds like you yourself are a "sophomore", if you catch my drift.
Mike Girouard
2004-09-10 11:49:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tregembo
Post by Owain Sutton
Post by catastrophic success
do classical aficionados like pink floyd the wall?
Not if they take any pride in their elitism, they don't. :D
First of all, "classical" is not a type of music. It's a period of
time/number of specific years of Serious music. Serious music runs from the
Baroque period (mid 1600's) through the Contemporary period (today).
Secondly, you don't create Serious influenced R & R just by adding an few
members of an orchestra or programming your synthesizer to sound like
violins.
Thirdly, since school's in, do a little homework.
Ray Arthur
Congratulations! In one post you managed to insert both feet in your mouth.

FoggyTown
Mike Girouard
2004-09-10 11:49:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tregembo
Post by Owain Sutton
Post by catastrophic success
do classical aficionados like pink floyd the wall?
Not if they take any pride in their elitism, they don't. :D
First of all, "classical" is not a type of music. It's a period of
time/number of specific years of Serious music. Serious music runs from the
Baroque period (mid 1600's) through the Contemporary period (today).
Secondly, you don't create Serious influenced R & R just by adding an few
members of an orchestra or programming your synthesizer to sound like
violins.
Thirdly, since school's in, do a little homework.
Ray Arthur
Congratulations! In one post you managed to insert both feet in your mouth.

FoggyTown
Peter T. Daniels
2004-09-10 12:31:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike Girouard
Congratulations! In one post you managed to insert both feet in your mouth.
FoggyTown
The foggy one continues to contribute nothing to the newsgroup (and now
to several others as well), this time in duplicate.
--
Peter T. Daniels ***@att.net
b s
2004-09-05 18:55:06 UTC
Permalink
No general answer to that - we are all different. I like the Stones better
than Pink Floyd. Some of the current groups are pretty interesting, and
Frank Zappa has done a lot of kewl stuff as well.
Post by catastrophic success
do classical aficionados like pink floyd the wall?
Chris
2004-09-05 19:13:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by catastrophic success
do classical aficionados like pink floyd the wall?
i like echoes and DSOTM more then the wall and just got the Telarc cd of
the Boston Baroque lead by martin pearlman performing Bach's Orchestral
suits 1-4 and a nice Lithuanian chamber orchestra recording of Bach Piano
Concerti for .99 on ebay.I have however been on a King Crimson binge lateley
picking up Court of the Crimson King,In the Wake of Posiedon and Lizard as
well as the ELP box set The Return of the Manticore.I have been reading the
material here; http://www.songsouponsea.com/ about what King Crimson and
more specifically Pete Sinfield, lyricist were relateing with their music.I
have also revisited the Moody Blues and find it to be really very
satisfying listening and i can be seen singing along with Justin as i roar
down the highway.
Nightingale
2004-09-06 02:25:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chris
I
have also revisited the Moody Blues and find it to be really very
satisfying listening and i can be seen singing along with Justin as i roar
down the highway.
I like some of the early Moody Blues, but am not as fond of their later CDs.
--
The better the voyce is, the meeter it is to honour and
serve God there-with: and the voyce of man is chiefely
to be imployed to that ende.

Omnis spiritus laudet Dominum.

-William Byrd
Daniel Kolle
2004-09-05 19:37:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by catastrophic success
do classical aficionados like pink floyd the wall?
I am entirely indifferent to any form of rock.

--
-Daniel "Mr. Brevity" Kolle; 16 A.A. #2035
Koji Kondo, Yo-Yo Ma, Gustav Mahler, Krzysztof Penderecki, and Geirr Tveitt are my Gods.
Head of EAC Denial Department and Madly Insane Scientist.
4 Wheeler
2004-09-05 19:59:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Daniel Kolle
Post by catastrophic success
do classical aficionados like pink floyd the wall?
I am entirely indifferent to any form of rock.
Dewd, you woudent be if you listend to Linard Skinard and got sloshed on Jack Danels.
Goodtime Old Suthern Whiskey and Good Time Old Suthern RockandRoll! Come on Danny boy, get
ripped and let er rip. Itll bust ya right out of that Gustavo Pendrickergast funk cage! And
I aint never heard of the YoyoMama playing bass with his teeth on Qualudes neither!!!

Parteee!
Post by Daniel Kolle
--
-Daniel "Mr. Brevity" Kolle; 16 A.A. #2035
Koji Kondo, Yo-Yo Ma, Gustav Mahler, Krzysztof Penderecki, and Geirr Tveitt are my Gods.
Head of EAC Denial Department and Madly Insane Scientist.
Ryan Tanaka
2004-09-06 01:09:38 UTC
Permalink
***@hotmail.com (catastrophic success) wrote in message news:<***@posting.google.com>...

There's always Frank Zappa. :o
Post by catastrophic success
do classical aficionados like pink floyd the wall?
DG
2004-09-06 01:30:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ryan Tanaka
There's always Frank Zappa. :o
Thankfully, there were microphones before FZ!!!!

Broadway The Hard Way, You Are What You Is, You Can't Do That On Stage
Anymore
wim
2004-09-06 02:00:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by catastrophic success
do classical aficionados like pink floyd the wall?
Only fans of later Pink Floyd like the Wall.
Peter T. Daniels
2004-09-06 11:43:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by wim
Post by catastrophic success
do classical aficionados like pink floyd the wall?
Only fans of later Pink Floyd like the Wall.
Isn't that a tautology?

Why is this in rec.music.classical?
--
Peter T. Daniels ***@att.net
Governor Swill
2004-09-06 13:53:52 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 06 Sep 2004 11:43:56 GMT, "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Why is this in rec.music.classical?
Same reason it's in
rec.music.gdead,alt.music.pink-floyd,rec.music.classical,rec.music.rock-pop-r+b.1960s

Bedwarmer
--
They never stop thinking about new ways to harm our conuntry
and our people and neither do we.
-- George W. Bush, at the White House, August 5, 2004
wim
2004-09-06 14:34:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by wim
Post by catastrophic success
do classical aficionados like pink floyd the wall?
Only fans of later Pink Floyd like the Wall.
Isn't that a tautology?
You can be a fan of later Pink Floyd and like the Wall,
but my statement infers that if you like the Wall then
you are probably a fan of later Pink Floyd, which isn't a tautology,
because you could like that album only. My statement is that this is
unlikely,
that you have to be a fan of later Pink Floyd first.
Not in rec.music.classical.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Why is this in rec.music.classical?
--
Alan Watkins
2004-09-07 21:09:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by wim
Post by catastrophic success
do classical aficionados like pink floyd the wall?
Only fans of later Pink Floyd like the Wall.
Isn't that a tautology?
Why is this in rec.music.classical?
Because they use the same notes in different ways? Fan of The Nits,
Hendrix, The Who, Marley, Ashley Hutchings, Cream, Smashing Pumpkins,
Fairport Convention to name only a few.

And, in common, they all have/had brilliant percussionists. Of course
I would be interested and impressed whether in rec.music.classical or
whichever group they "properly" belong to.

Honestly, it's the same notes just handled differently perhaps. I
like the way some of them "handle it differently".

For what it is worth, which is probably not much, Rob Kloert
(brilliant drummer for The Nits) loves Stravinsky's writing for
orchestral percussion and he could step into any orchestra I know and
play Stravinsky's percussion without a problem.

Listen to Carlton Barrett for Marley and then try those "fills" or
Philly Jo Jones for brushes for that matter. Yes, probably trapped on
the wrong genre by cross posting but in the skills they have/had they
have EVERY right to be on rec.music.classical even if by accident.

There are just rudiments. What you do with them, where you use them,
is a matter of personal choice I would think.

I believe that applies to every instrument. The message may have been
cross posted to the wrong groups but many musicians do not know
anything about groups.

Sometimes they just sit and listen or watch and think: "That's
fabulous playing."

When Krupa played at Ronnie Scott's in England many years ago most of
the first two rows were occupied by...errr....orchestral
percussionists. I wonder why?

Kind regards,
Alan M. Watkins

Kind regards,
Alan M. Watkins

Kind regards,
Alan M. Watkins
Lookingglass
2004-09-08 11:06:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Alan Watkins
Because they use the same notes in different ways? Fan of The Nits,
Hendrix, The Who, Marley, Ashley Hutchings, Cream, Smashing Pumpkins,
Fairport Convention to name only a few.
Kind regards,
Alan M. Watkins
I am very curious what a professional percussionist's opinion of the Who's
Keith Moon... though IMO, he is not very well recorded... and I don't know
if you ever "experienced" him in a live situation when he was with us... I
am a big fan of the Who... I remember when I first heard TOMMY, it was the
drumming that captured my attention... that and of course the entire work
itself... but the drumming on a song like SPARKS brought it to life... for
me.

Thank you
Dave www.Shemakhan.com
Alan Watkins
2004-09-10 01:17:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lookingglass
Post by Alan Watkins
Because they use the same notes in different ways? Fan of The Nits,
Hendrix, The Who, Marley, Ashley Hutchings, Cream, Smashing Pumpkins,
Fairport Convention to name only a few.
Kind regards,
Alan M. Watkins
I am very curious what a professional percussionist's opinion of the Who's
Keith Moon... though IMO, he is not very well recorded... and I don't know
if you ever "experienced" him in a live situation when he was with us... I
am a big fan of the Who... I remember when I first heard TOMMY, it was the
drumming that captured my attention... that and of course the entire work
itself... but the drumming on a song like SPARKS brought it to life... for
me.
Thank you
Dave www.Shemakhan.com
No I did not hear him live but he was a trailblazer in rock drumming.
Going out of tempi, going out of metre if you like, and then
colliding back on the first beat of the next bar in which you are
back in metre is a high skill. There are WHO tracks in which he just
takes the mickey out of their metre.

His out of tempo playing was what made him a great artist. There is a
track somewhere on a Who album (I cannot remember which) where the
group are in basic 4/4 and he is somewhere in about 5/4, 6/8 as
"fills" and settles back into 4/4 when it suits him. To dip in and
out of that while they are in 4/4 in such a way is great playing.

Dead at 32 from a drug that was supposed to cure another addiction.

Ditto at 40-something Phil Seaman who is the drummer on Strawberry
Fields for Ever (Beatles), the counting quite beyond Ringo. In Phil's
case it was too much heroin substitute.

Kind regards,
Alan M. Watkins



He was a wonderful player.
Lookingglass
2004-09-10 02:53:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Alan Watkins
Ditto at 40-something Phil Seaman who is the drummer on Strawberry
Fields for Ever (Beatles), the counting quite beyond Ringo. In Phil's
case it was too much heroin substitute.
Kind regards,
Alan M. Watkins
Thank you. This information about Phil Seaman I did not know. Did Ringo NOT
sit in on the SFF recording sessions?

Dave www.Shemakhan.com
Coby Beck
2004-09-09 01:48:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Alan Watkins
Kind regards,
Alan M. Watkins
Kind regards,
Alan M. Watkins
Kind regards,
Alan M. Watkins
Alan, you are too kind.
--
Coby Beck
(remove #\Space "coby 101 @ big pond . com")

(sorry, impulse control problems...)
Jeff Ruskin
2004-09-09 02:03:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Coby Beck
Post by Alan Watkins
Kind regards,
Alan M. Watkins
Kind regards,
Alan M. Watkins
Kind regards,
Alan M. Watkins
Alan, you are too kind.
"Penis In A Pencil Sharpener"
Post by Coby Beck
--
Coby Beck
(sorry, impulse control problems...)
Sean Van Sice
2004-09-08 17:01:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by catastrophic success
do classical aficionados like pink floyd the wall?
I consider myself somewhat of a "Classical" Aficionado. And I also
consider myself somewhat of a "Classic Rock" buff, as well as some
newer rock.

As far as what rock I enjoy; Metallica(pre-"Black Album") Eric
Clapton(Cream, Derek and the Dominoes and all his solo works) Led
Zeppelin, The Who, Black Sabbath, Jimi Hendrix and Stevie Ray Vaughan,
just to name a few. :)
wim
2004-09-09 04:01:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sean Van Sice
Post by catastrophic success
do classical aficionados like pink floyd the wall?
I consider myself somewhat of a "Classical" Aficionado. And I also
consider myself somewhat of a "Classic Rock" buff, as well as some
newer rock.
As far as what rock I enjoy; Metallica(pre-"Black Album") Eric
Clapton(Cream, Derek and the Dominoes and all his solo works) Led
Zeppelin, The Who, Black Sabbath, Jimi Hendrix and Stevie Ray Vaughan,
just to name a few. :)
What is it with classical music afficionadoes and poncy rock music?
Is it a seeking of the inner Beethoven?
How about symphonic rock...Vanilla Fudge, much overdriven guitar not as
present.
jeffc
2004-09-08 19:09:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by catastrophic success
do classical aficionados like pink floyd the wall?
I like both, but know rock more. I like The Wall in pieces, but if you sit
down and listen to the whole thing in one sitting, it's rather dark and
depressing. But then if you think about it, so is "Time".

I like Rush and Queen as well, for sheer musicianship and talent. I also
like hard rock, but with a lot of rock style is much more important than
substance. Sometimes I'm just in the mood for style. Sometimes you just
need to get in your car, roll down the windows, and shout with Rage Against
the Machine. I think you know what I mean.
Kelly Humphries <kpiscesatspeakeasydotnet@>
2004-09-09 05:09:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by jeffc
Post by catastrophic success
do classical aficionados like pink floyd the wall?
I like both, but know rock more. I like The Wall in pieces, but if you sit
down and listen to the whole thing in one sitting, it's rather dark and
depressing. But then if you think about it, so is "Time".
I like Rush and Queen as well, for sheer musicianship and talent. I also
like hard rock, but with a lot of rock style is much more important than
substance. Sometimes I'm just in the mood for style. Sometimes you just
need to get in your car, roll down the windows, and shout with Rage Against
the Machine. I think you know what I mean.
<dave kelly>
I'm tellin ya, the ONLY rekkid ya need is:

http://www.guitar9.com/liveattheusfestivaldvd.html

Feel THAT!
</dave kelly>
Steven Martin
2004-09-09 15:59:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by catastrophic success
do classical aficionados like pink floyd the wall?
Well this classical aficionado loves the Wall but prefers earlier Pink
Floyd. Personally my favorite Floyd album is Meddle.

My favorite classical composers : Brahms, Beethoven, Verdi, Mahler,
Debussy, Vaughan Williams, Prokofiev, Schumann, Mendellsohn, Dvorak
and Samuel Barber in no particular order.

Yes, it is true that Phil was a big fan of Charles Ives, I heard him
talk about it on the Grateful Dead hour once. Personally I can't
stand Ives but I don't hold it against Phil. I read that "Attics of
my Life" was influenced by Bach although I can't really hear it. In
general, I understand that Phil was the guy in the band that listened
to Classical.

Some days I want to listen to Bach and some days I want to play a
really ornery Shakedown from '84. It depends on my mood.

Steve
brew ziggins
2004-09-09 16:03:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steven Martin
Some days I want to listen to Bach and some days I want to play a
really ornery Shakedown from '84. It depends on my mood.
What Steve said!!!!
--
Lost my shape, trying to act casual
Can't stop, might end up in the hospital
~
l bruce higgins ithaca new york
lbh2 at cornell dot edu
dave b.
2004-09-10 00:07:02 UTC
Permalink
The late Leonard Bernstein, a classical composer, teacher and genius,
used to say he actually thought the Kinks' "You Really Got Me" was cool,
because it was a). based on the myxolydian mode, and b).
modulates rather improbably first up a whole step, then resumes the
myxolydian riff on the dominant scale degree. Naturally, he was
impressed by the Beatles, liked much of 1970's jazz-influenced rock,
but was disenchanted by the pop music of the 1980's (shortly before his
death). [Probably because the advent of Rap tolled the death-knell for
melody and much harmony].

Wilfrid Mellers and Walter Everett are musicologists who have written
superb, and serious, detailed musical analyses of the work of the
Beatles. Not to be missed for true Beatles aficionados.

Burt Bacharach is a great musical mind with very eclectic tastes... He
once said, "To understand my music, you have to listen to what I listen
to." Besides being smitten by Brazilian native rhythms like the Baião,
Axé, Forró and Samba, he was reportedly bowled over by the album AJA
by Steely Dan. He had studied composition by the French classical
composer Darius Milhaud. He derived much of his groove from Black
Gospel, which has its roots in Negro Spiritual and Slave Songs, which
of course can be directly linked to African musical idioms. Jazz's
grandfather is certainly the African bembé rhythm, with its emphasis on
triplets. When the children of Africa unwillingly came to the New World
in the "African Diaspora", wherever they settled they created something
that was a melding of their native cultural sensibilities and wherever they
happened to find themselves... Think: Reggae, Samba, Afro-Cuban,
Merengue, Batucada, Ragtime, Swing, The Blues, etc.

Only stupid people can afford to be music snobs; people who *really*
know, love and understand music can see the value and spirituality in
everything from Maori chants, to a Wagner opera, to a Charlie Parker
solo to a Beatles tune to the Sex Pistols. The rage and cynicism of
Johnny Rotten singing a discordant "I am an Anti-Christ-a, and I'm an
an anarchist-a..." Who was the philosopher who once said, "Nothing
human is foreign to me." ? I think Ray Charles, when interviewed
about his controversial album of Country-Western covers, once said "I
listen to every style, because when you get right down to it, it's *all*
soul music."

Pieces like JESUS CHRIST SUPERSTAR, TOMMY and WEST SIDE STORY are
mindblowing in their achievement, because they represent a synthesis of
(seemingly) disparate or "irreconcilable" musical styles. But if you
stand back and breathe in all humanity, no music is necessarily
unrelated.

Dave B.
Post by catastrophic success
do classical aficionados like pink floyd the wall?
Lookingglass
2004-09-10 02:50:39 UTC
Permalink
"dave b." <***@NOSPAMgvtc.com> wrote in message news:PpWdnXfWUY6Pbd3cRVn-***@gvtc.com...

[snip]
Post by dave b.
Only stupid people can afford to be music snobs; people who *really*
know, love and understand music can see the value and spirituality in
everything from Maori chants, to a Wagner opera, to a Charlie Parker
solo to a Beatles tune to the Sex Pistols. The rage and cynicism of
Johnny Rotten singing a discordant "I am an Anti-Christ-a, and I'm an
an anarchist-a..." Who was the philosopher who once said, "Nothing
human is foreign to me." ? I think Ray Charles, when interviewed
about his controversial album of Country-Western covers, once said
"I
listen to every style, because when you get right down to it, it's *all*
soul music."
Pieces like JESUS CHRIST SUPERSTAR, TOMMY and WEST SIDE STORY are
mindblowing in their achievement, because they represent a synthesis of
(seemingly) disparate or "irreconcilable" musical styles. But if you
stand back and breathe in all humanity, no music is necessarily
unrelated.
Dave B.
Thanks Dave... you said it better than I can.

Dave www.Shemakhan.com
Matt Sottile
2004-09-10 06:12:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lookingglass
[snip]
Post by dave b.
Only stupid people can afford to be music snobs; people who *really*
know, love and understand music can see the value and spirituality in
everything from Maori chants, to a Wagner opera, to a Charlie Parker
solo to a Beatles tune to the Sex Pistols. The rage and cynicism of
Johnny Rotten singing a discordant "I am an Anti-Christ-a, and I'm an
an anarchist-a..." Who was the philosopher who once said, "Nothing
human is foreign to me." ? I think Ray Charles, when interviewed
about his controversial album of Country-Western covers, once said
"I
listen to every style, because when you get right down to it, it's *all*
soul music."
Pieces like JESUS CHRIST SUPERSTAR, TOMMY and WEST SIDE STORY are
mindblowing in their achievement, because they represent a synthesis of
(seemingly) disparate or "irreconcilable" musical styles. But if you
stand back and breathe in all humanity, no music is necessarily
unrelated.
Dave B.
Thanks Dave... you said it better than I can.
Ditto.

-m
Smack
2004-09-10 07:28:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by dave b.
Who was the philosopher who once said, "Nothing
human is foreign to me." ?
Publius Terentius Afer. I suppose he was a philosopher in the general
sense, but he was a playwright by trade. I'm pretty sure the line comes
from one of his plays.
--
Stephen Mack

"Nobody's smart enough to be wrong all the time." -Ken Wilber
Lookingglass
2004-09-10 19:45:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Smack
Post by dave b.
Who was the philosopher who once said, "Nothing
human is foreign to me." ?
Publius Terentius Afer. I suppose he was a philosopher in the general
sense, but he was a playwright by trade. I'm pretty sure the line comes
from one of his plays.
--
Stephen Mack
Terence 190-159 BC

Dave www.Shemakhan.com
Peter T. Daniels
2004-09-10 12:30:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by dave b.
Pieces like JESUS CHRIST SUPERSTAR, TOMMY and WEST SIDE STORY are
mindblowing in their achievement, because they represent a synthesis of
(seemingly) disparate or "irreconcilable" musical styles.
Unfortunately Mr. Lloyd Webber kept trying to write something good for
decades after that. Mr. Who seems not to have. Mr. Bernstein never
succeeded in that genre again, but did write several good pieces
subsequently, the last of them being Songfest.
--
Peter T. Daniels ***@att.net
Goy Liath
2004-09-10 19:18:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by dave b.
Only stupid people can afford to be music snobs; people who *really*
know, love and understand music can see the value and spirituality in
everything from Maori chants, to a Wagner opera, to a Charlie Parker
solo to a Beatles tune to the Sex Pistols. The rage and cynicism of
Johnny Rotten singing a discordant "I am an Anti-Christ-a, and I'm an
an anarchist-a..." Who was the philosopher who once said, "Nothing
human is foreign to me." ? I think Ray Charles, when interviewed
about his controversial album of Country-Western covers, once said "I
listen to every style, because when you get right down to it, it's *all*
soul music."
was johnny rotten being stupid by dissing so much of rock music as
phony? i don't think he had much use for bowie and other art rockers.
he even said clash sucked because clash learned how to play.

isn't slobbery even worse than snobbery?

snobbery is the sin of too much refinement.
but slobbery is the sin of being unwilling to wipe one's ass after
shitting.
Bill Moore
2004-09-10 20:20:55 UTC
Permalink
Newsgroups: rec.music.gdead,alt.music.pink-floyd,rec.music.classical,rec.music.rock-pop-r+b.1960s
Subject: Re: what's the fav rock music among classical people and vice versa?
Date: 10 Sep 2004 12:18:10 -0700
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Post by dave b.
Only stupid people can afford to be music snobs; people who *really*
know, love and understand music can see the value and spirituality in
everything from Maori chants, to a Wagner opera, to a Charlie Parker
solo to a Beatles tune to the Sex Pistols. The rage and cynicism of
Johnny Rotten singing a discordant "I am an Anti-Christ-a, and I'm an
an anarchist-a..." Who was the philosopher who once said, "Nothing
human is foreign to me." ? I think Ray Charles, when interviewed
about his controversial album of Country-Western covers, once said "I
listen to every style, because when you get right down to it, it's *all*
soul music."
was johnny rotten being stupid by dissing so much of rock music as
phony? i don't think he had much use for bowie and other art rockers.
he even said clash sucked because clash learned how to play.
Johnny was just being a snot. The other Sex Pistols (apart from Sid)
could certainly play. Jones and Cook are great players of Sex Pistols
music. As is Glen Matlock, who was allegedly kicked out of the group
for "liking the Beatles". He's been playing with them on their occasional
"filthy lucre" reunion tours.
isn't slobbery even worse than snobbery?
snobbery is the sin of too much refinement.
but slobbery is the sin of being unwilling to wipe one's ass after
shitting.
Smack
2004-09-11 03:43:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Goy Liath
snobbery is the sin of too much refinement.
No, snobbery is when refinement forgets where it came from. No one is
born cultured.
--
Stephen Mack

"Nobody's smart enough to be wrong all the time." -Ken Wilber
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